Artisanal small-scale gold mining polluted this stream and deforested sections of the Madre de Dios area of Peru. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Gold rush, mercury legacy: Small-scale mining for gold has produced long-lasting toxic pollution, from 1860s California to modern Peru

Small-scale gold mining operations in developing countries are major sources of toxic mercury pollution, using techniques that haven't changed much since the California Gold Rush 150 years ago.
Diligence, technological progress and a little luck have together solved a 20 year mystery of the cosmos. CSIRO/Alex Cherney

Half the matter in the universe was missing – we found it hiding in the cosmos

Cosmologists had only been able to find half the matter that should exist in the universe. With the discovery of a new astronomical phenomenon and new telescopes, researchers just found the rest.
They may look comfy to sit on but you’d plummet through and hit the ground. Sam Schooler/Unsplash

What would it feel like to touch a cloud?

You might have already felt what it would be like inside a cloud made of condensed water vapor.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft onboard is raised into a vertical position on the launch pad at Launch Complex 39A. NASA/Bill Ingalls

SpaceX reaches for milestone in spaceflight – a private company launches astronauts into orbit

SpaceX's launch of astronauts to the International Space Station will make it the first private company to launch humans to space. The effort has ramifications for NASA and spaceflight in general.
View of blood collection tubes in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds, in DeLand, Florida. Paul Hennessy / Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Why COVID-19 immunity passports may violate US law

Amazon and General Motors are among companies exploring ways to test employees for COVID-19 infection, but these measures may be against the law.
Some of the highest coronavirus hospitalization rates in Denver are in neighborhoods near Valverde, a community that was once redlined. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images

Is your neighborhood raising your coronavirus risk? Redlining decades ago set communities up for greater danger

Neighborhood characteristics like pollution from busy roads, widespread public transit use and lack of community-based health care are putting certain communities at greater risk from COVID-19.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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