Actors Jason Alexander (George), Jerry Seinfeld (Jerry), Michael Richards (Kramer) and Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Elaine) stand behind bars in a scene during the last days of filming the final episode in Studio City, California, April 3, 1998. David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

Science of ‘Seinfeld’

A protester raises a fist in New York’s Washington Square Park during a June 2, 2020 demonstration. Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

Where are the African American leaders?

Sweeping changes were possible in the past because black leaders were willing to risk their lives and call out problems before they became crises.
Gerald Dent, left, is joined by James Featherstone and Niles Ringgold at a rally for felon voting rights, in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 10, 2020. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Stripping voting rights from felons is about politics, not punishment

Recent efforts to restore voting rights to the formerly incarcerated, a crucial Democratic constituency, could have important implications for the 2020 presidential election.
Protesters in Hong Kong during demonstrations against China’s draft bill to impose national security laws on the semi-autonomous territory. Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Why Hong Kong’s untold history of protecting refugee rights matters now in its struggle with China

The cherished legal rights that Beijing seeks to suppress in Hong Kong were established, in part, by Vietnamese asylum-seekers who fought for their freedom in court in the 1980s.
A health worker carries out an olfactory test to monitor smell loss to a resident 65 km from Buenos Aires city, on May 24, 2020, amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19, smell and taste – how is COVID-19 different from other respiratory diseases?

Many respiratory viruses cause us to temporarily lose our sense of smell. But SARS-CoV-2 isn't like those other viruses. Researchers are now exploring how it differs and whether patients recover.
Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators shooting tear gas next to St. John’s Episcopal Church outside of the White House, June 1, 2020 in Washington D.C., during a protest over the death of George Floyd. JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP via Getty Images

What is tear gas?

The chemical weapon, tear gas, was used in Washington DC, Los Angeles, Orlando and several other cities to control crowds protesting the death of George Floyd. But what is it? Does it cause harm?
California was one of the first states to enact shelter-in-place orders. Aydin Palabiyikoglu/Getty Images

California’s early shelter-in-place order may have saved 1,600 lives in one month

Four researchers studied California's shelter-in-place orders to figure out how many lives were saved by its early enactment. Here's what they found.
There have already been at least 100 instances of journalists being assaulted or harassed while covering recent protests. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

It can’t happen here – and then it did

For almost a century, American popular culture has perpetuated the idea that only journalists working in foreign countries could be in danger.
President Donald Trump makes a statement to the press in the Rose Garden about restoring “law and order” in the wake of protests. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Can the president really order the military to occupy US cities and states?

President Trump has warned that he will send the military into states to curb protests. Is Trump’s warning bluster? Or does the president have the authority to send the military into American cities?
Richard Byma from By-Acre farms in Sussex County, New Jersey, tends to his Holstein herd. Neville Elder/Corbis via Getty Images)

New Jersey’s small, networked dairy farms are a model for a more resilient food system

Small-scale dairy farmers are struggling across the US – but in New Jersey they've developed a model that keeps their products and their customers local.
Emergency medical technicians bring a patient into Wyckoff Hospital in the Borough of Brooklyn on April 6, 2020 in New York. Bryna R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images.

Doctors can’t treat COVID-19 effectively without recognizing the social justice aspects of health

While African Americans account for about 14% of the US population, they have accounted for about 60% of deaths from the virus. Several physicians offer an idea they think could help.
In 2018 scientists of the Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control tested a new way to suppress mosquito populations carrying the Zika virus. RHONA WISE/AFP via Getty Images

Genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in Florida and Texas beginning this summer – silver bullet or jumping the gun?

Release of GM mosquitoes in Florida is imminent. But a multidisciplinary team of scientists believe that more studies are needed first. They encourage a publicly accessible registry for GM organisms.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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