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Members of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal organization, which began in Pennsylvania in 1967, holding a meeting in France. Photo by Jacques Pavlovsky/Sygma via Getty Images

What is charismatic Catholicism?

The coronavirus forced the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary to break with tradition. Illustration by Anurag Papolu/The Conversation; dictionary photo by Spauln via Getty Images and model of COVID-19 by fpm/iStock via Getty Images

How COVID-19 is changing the English language

Open enrollment for health insurance in the healthcare.gov marketplaces begins Nov. 1. https://www.healthcare.gov

If Obamacare goes away, here are eight ways your life will be affected

The Affordable Care Act has a date with the U.S. Supreme Court on Nov. 10. In the wake of Justice Ginsburg's death, the health care law hangs in the balance of a court with a four-four split.
Siblings, as well as parents, can help young learners become avid readers. Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Teaching kids to read during the coronavirus pandemic: 5 questions answered

If families embrace reading as fun and routine and teachers work more closely than before with the families of their students, it's possible that remote learning won't be a huge obstacle to literacy.
Families are still the primary caregivers for older Americans. MoMo Productions/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Video: How will society change as the US population ages?

Americans 65 and older are living longer. The change toward longer old age in the U.S. will have profound effects on health care needs, families and what it means to be old.
When Hurricane Dorian, seen here from the International Space Station, stalled over the Bahamas in September 2019, its winds, rain and storm surge devastated the islands. NASA

What makes hurricanes stall, and why is that so hard to forecast?

Hurricane stalling has become common over the past half-century, and their average forward speed has also slowed.
Football players from Lee Central High School in Bishopville, South Carolina, share a meal with players from the Robert E. Lee Academy. Lee County in South Carolina is still segregated. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Pandemic school funding debate in South Carolina rekindles Jim Crow-era controversy

The battle to expand private education in South Carolina amid the pandemic mirrors previous struggles over civil rights and highlights the ways systemic racism has undermined public education.
The microbes in the mother’s gut can alter the number of neurons in the baby’s brain and the connections they make. bestdesigns/Getty Images

How a pregnant mouse’s microbes influence offspring’s brain development – new study offers clues

Microbes in the gut aren't just important for digesting your food. In pregnant women, these gut microbes are producing chemicals that are essential for proper brain development of the fetus.
Real estate prices are still related to a neighborhood’s racial composition, despite laws prohibiting the explicit consideration of race in appraisals. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Homes in Black and Latino neighborhoods still undervalued 50 years after US banned using race in real estate appraisals

New research shows homes in white areas have appreciated $200,000 more since 1980 than similar homes in nonwhite areas – a result of both old racist housing policies and modern real estate practices.
In the not-too-distant future, tattoos could become medical diagnostic devices as well as body art. LightFieldStudios/iStock via Getty Images

Dynamic tattoos promise to warn wearers of health threats

Researchers are developing tattoo inks that do more than make pretty colors. Some can sense chemicals, temperature and UV radiation, setting the stage for tattoos that diagnose health problems.
Demonstrators outside the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 21 called on the Republican-controlled Senate not to confirm a new justice until the next president is in office. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Unlike US, Europe picks top judges with bipartisan approval to create ideologically balanced high courts

The Supreme Court doesn't have to be so polarized. Many European countries make judicial appointments in a term-limited, intentionally depoliticized way to promote consensus and compromise.

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  1. How and when will we know that a COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective?
  2. SARS-CoV-2 infection can block pain, opening up unexpected new possibilities for research into pain relief medication
  3. If Obamacare goes away, here are eight ways your life will be affected
  4. Dynamic tattoos promise to warn wearers of health threats
  5. Ancient microbial life used arsenic to thrive in a world without oxygen

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