Arts + Culture – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Library subjects and call numbers can be the subject of controversy. jakkaje808/shutterstock.com

The bias hiding in your library

The way books are sorted at the library can be highly political, touching upon issues of race and identity.
The 2002 installation ‘Rape Garage’ displayed statistics about rape, along with first-person narratives about sexual trauma. Stefanie Bruser, Josh Edwards, Katie Grone and Lindsey Lee. Mixed media site installation at “At Home: A Kentucky Project with Judy Chicago and Donald Woodman.” 2001-2002. Courtesy the Flower Archive, housed at the Pennsylvania State University Archives.

A half-century before the hashtag, artists were on the front lines of #MeToo

Many Renaissance-era masterworks depicted rape and sexual assault as erotic. Beginning in the 1970s, artists worked to redefine rape as a crime of aggression and act of female subjugation.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
A man dressed as Saint Patrick blesses the crowd in Dublin as the parade makes its way through the Irish capital in 1998. AP Photo/John Cogill

The truth about St. Patrick’s Day

The Irish continue to express gratitude for St. Patrick's unselfish commitment to their spiritual well-being, even as the rest of the world celebrates by drowning in booze.
Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ has been nominated for best adapted screenplay at the 91st Academy Awards. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Oscars 2019: Beyond the stats, why diversity matters

Numbers alone don't relay the importance of people seeing their own experiences and lives mirrored in popular culture.
A television set turned on in the West Wing of the White House. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

A brief history of presidential lethargy

Calvin Coolidge, during one stretch of his presidency, was getting 15 hours of shut-eye each day, while William Howard Taft was known for nodding off during public events.
Female members of Congress wore white in a nod to suffragists during the State of the Union. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

How white became the color of suffrage

Being the media-savvy women that they were, suffragists realized they needed to come up with a meaningful, recognizable brand.
Artist Jennifer Rubell hired a model to vacuum for two hours each night from Feb. 1 to Feb. 17. Ryan Maxwell Photography

Ivanka and her tower of crumbs

A new piece of performance art features a lookalike Ivanka Trump vacuuming crumbs. Not only is it a cutting commentary on labor and gender, but it also highlights the complicity of the viewer.
Architect and designer Florence Knoll Bassett poses with her dog, Cartree, in this photograph circa 1950. Courtesy Knoll Archive

Florence Knoll Bassett’s mid-century design diplomacy

Knoll is best known for transforming the design of America's corporate offices. But she was also on the front lines of a State Department effort to promote American ingenuity and capitalism abroad.
At some point, jazz went from the music of youthful rebellion to that of the cultured elite. Freedom Master/shutterstock

Did academia kill jazz?

Jazz used to be experienced on a dance floor. But over time, it became something to dissect and analyze.
‘Say cheese so I can show all my friends how cute you are – and unwittingly show corporations your age, race and gender!’ Fancy Studio/Shutterstock.com

The real problem with posting about your kids online

Parents have engaged in forms of 'sharenting' for generations. The digital age has complicated things, but while critics make some valid points, they're not seeing the forest for the trees.
Los Angeles Rams head coach Sean McVay, left, shakes hands with New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Belichick versus McVay: An age-old question of leadership

Even though young leaders and old leaders may have different approaches, one isn't necessarily better than the other. But in order to succeed, a leader better be able to bridge generational divides.