Arts + Culture – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Record companies released stereo demonstration albums that showcased how sound could move from left to right, creating a sense of movement. From the collection of Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder

How stereo was first sold to a skeptical public

Sixty years ago, stereo promised to forever change the way people listened to music. But how could record companies convince customers to buy a new record player, speakers and amplifier?
Texas Tribune reporter Jay Root interviews New Mexico State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn along Highway 652 near the Texas-New Mexico border. Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune/Courtesy of NewsMatch

How local journalism can upend the ‘fake news’ narrative

A recent survey found that Americans trust local media outlets far more than national ones.
For centuries, Pulter’s manuscript lay untouched at the University of Leeds’ Brotherton Library. University of Leeds Library, Brotherton Collection, MS Lt q 32

In the 1600s Hester Pulter wondered, ‘Why must I forever be confined?’ – now her poems are online for all to see

In a time when women were expected to be silent, no topic was off limits for Pulter, who penned verses about politics, science and loss. Her manuscript was just published in a free digital archive.
‘It’s really difficult to live as a rock musician in Bangladesh,“ says Samir Hafiz, a guitarist in the heavy metal band Warfaze. Facebook

Rock ‘n’ roll is dying in Bangladesh

For decades, Bangladesh had a very vibrant – and highly political – rock scene. But the genre is struggling to survive the country's crackdown on dissent and increasing Islamic conservatism.
‘Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor’ by William Halsall (1882). Pilgrim Hall Museum

Why the Pilgrims were actually able to survive

The Pilgrims repeatedly thanked God for their good fortune. But without two earlier developments, the entire undertaking at New Plymouth would have likely failed.
In the 1960s, the Temple established nine residential care facilities for the elderly and six homes for foster children in the Redwood Valley. Peoples Temple / Jonestown Gallery/flickr

Before the tragedy at Jonestown, the people of Peoples Temple had a dream

Throughout the movement's history, African Americans and whites lived, worked and protested side-by-side. It was one of the few long-term experiments in American interracial communalism.
For decades, native-born American Jews changed their names to improve their job prospects. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Why are some Americans changing their names?

The demographics of name change petitioners today – and the reasons that they give – tell a complicated story of race, class and culture.
American grandmaster Fabiano Caruana, shown here at the 2017 Tradewise Gibraltar Masters tournament, could become the first American-born world chess champion since Bobby Fischer. David Llada/American Chess Magazine

5 things to know about Fabiano Caruana and his quest to become world chess champion

Daaim Shabazz, an international business professor and chess journalist, explains what's at stake as American grandmaster Fabiano Caruana fights for the World Chess Championship in London this month.
In 2016, nearly 10 percent of American kids were living in three-generation households, like this one in Detroit, Michigan. AP Photo/Paul Sancya

What’s behind the dramatic rise in 3-generation households?

Over the past 20 years, the number of American households that have grandparents, their kids and their grandkids living under the same roof has nearly doubled.
Young adults now spend more money on costumes than any other age group. Michaela Rehle/Reuters

Why has Halloween become so popular among adults?

The holiday used to be all about trick-or-treating in the neighborhood. No more – and it could something to do with the fact that traditional markers of adulthood have changed.
When The Village Voice shut down in August, the city’s protest movements lost one of their biggest champions. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

The Village Voice’s photographers captured change, turmoil unfolding on New York City’s streets

For decades, the alternative weekly's photographers served as the eyes of the streets, working with activists to document and publicize the anguish and rage of everyday New Yorkers.