Arts + Culture – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Fear of the unknown: would free radio broadcasts hurt gate receipts? glove and radio from www.shutterstock.com

When baseball almost banned broadcasts

With owners deeply divided over radio, a 20-year tug-of-war would ensue.
Drawings by male warriors – like Black Hawk’s ‘Dream or Vision or Himself Changed to a Destroyer or Riding a Bufalo Eagle (1880-1881)’ – often depicted visions perceived during meditation and fasting. New York State Historical Association, Fenimore Art Museum/John Bigelow Taylor

From the Great Plains, Native American masterpieces emerged

A new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art celebrates 2,000 years of artistic achievement.
Popular Latino musicians like Café Tacvba didn’t make an appearance. Ruy Landa/Flickr

Where were the Latinos at South by Southwest?

At an event that bills itself as 'the place to preview the technology of tomorrow today,' one of the fastest-growing, youngest and most tech-savvy segments of the population was largely ignored.
Vladimir Putin appears on the Kremlin-backed news network Russia Today. The multi-platform channel has already garnered more than 2 billion views on YouTube, making it the most-watched news network on the video-sharing website. Kremlin.ru/Wikimedia Commons

Russia fighting information wars with borrowed weapons

The airwaves arms race is on, and the Kremlin has taken a page from the playbook of its Cold War nemesis.
Seismic changes in the television industry have transformed the ways stories are told and consumed. from www.shutterstock.com

Why has TV storytelling become so complex?

Many refer to advances in television storytelling as novelistic or cinematic, but the medium deserves a term of its own: complex TV.
The ‘Blurred Lines’ verdict is only the most recent copyright ‘Controversy’ to erupt – just ask Prince. Mike Blake/Reuters

The messy history of music copyright suits

Like ambulance chasers, gimlet-eyed entertainment lawyers have been trained to detect the most trivial copyright infringements.
Britain’s Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle appear on the grounds of Kensington Palace in London, Nov. 27, 2017. AP Photo/Matt Dunham

Why do Americans fawn over British royalty?

It might seem strange, especially given the nation’s decision to sever ties with George III in 1776.
Young adult dystopian characters like Insurgent’s Tris are inspiring their female fans to shatter the glass ceiling. Lionsgate Films

Girls on fire: political empowerment in young adult dystopia

By featuring girls who buck the conventions of their world – and ours – films like Insurgent inspire fans to enact real change.
Studies have shown that mentioning misinformation – even in the process of combating it – can cause it to stick in listeners’ minds. from www.shutterstock.com

The media fuels vaccination myths – by trying to correct them

Studies show that the more familiar we become with false information, the more likely we are to later remember it as fact.
A newborn baby undergoes music therapy at a hospital in Slovakia. The hospital uses music therapy to treat infants who have been separated from their mothers. Petr Josek Snr/Reuters

Healthy songs: the amazing power of music therapy

From serving newborns to treating hospice patients, music can be used in medical and psychological treatment with surprising – and real – results.
Through his music, Lead Belly rejected the stereotype that country music was the domain of white artists, while blues music was reserved for blacks. Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives

Lead Belly’s music defied racial categorization

Lead Belly: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection depicts the fully-formed artist – a blues musician, yes, but also a performer of string-band, country and pop songs.
Some of the earliest applications of photography came in the fields of archaeology and botany. Pictured is a photograph from botanist Anna Atkins’ Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions (1843).

How photography evolved from science to art

Because a photograph came from a machine – not a human hand – many were not entirely sure if it could be called art.
Leonard Nimoy, who played Spock in the Star Trek series, died on Feb. 27 Nimoy star image via www.shutterstock.com

The effect Mr Spock had on me

Temple Grandin is perhaps the world's foremost advocate on autism. But before she became famous, she was an awkward young girl who found solace in Mr. Spock's logical world view in TV's Star Trek.
Once upon a time it was an eternal indestructible friendship Keizers

Do Cubans still dream in Russian?

The remnants of the Cuba-Soviet relationship are still very much part of Cuban culture – a fact on display at this month's Miami International Film Festival