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All 197 countries represented at COP26 signed the pact. Robert Perry/EPA

COP26: experts react to the UN climate summit and Glasgow Pact

Some companies’ net-zero plans include continuing to emit climate-warming greenhouse gases for decades. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Why corporate climate pledges of ‘net-zero’ emissions should trigger a healthy dose of skepticism

CEOs, including at oil companies and airlines, are relying on trees and oceans to capture and store carbon for them, but the numbers don’t add up.
Both climate change and policies to prevent it can rattle the economy. Citizen of the Planet/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The next big financial crisis could be triggered by climate change – but central banks can prevent it

It isn’t just the effects of climate change that could destabilize the financial system, it’s also fossil fuel assets losing value. The good news is that central banks can fix it.
July 2021 was Earth’s hottest month on record and was marked by disasters, including extreme storms, floods and wildfires. Thomas Lohnes via Getty Images

Climate change is relentless: Seemingly small shifts have big consequences

What might sound like small changes – temperatures another tenth of a degree warmer, sea level a few centimeters higher – have big consequences for the world around us.
The effects of climate change are heightened in urban areas and impose a high financial burden to the municipalities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Warmer, wetter, wilder: 38 million people in the Great Lakes region are threatened by climate change

Shoreline communities are already faltering under the weight of billions of dollars in damages — and worrying that climate change will continue to make things even worse.
Climate change made the devastating flooding in Belgium, Germany and other European countries in July 2021 more likely. Anthony Dehez/Belga/AFP via Getty Images

Is climate change to blame for extreme weather events? Attribution science says yes, for some – here’s how it works

A new attribution study finds human-caused climate change made Europe’s July floods more likely. What about Tennessee’s flooding? An atmospheric scientist explains how scientists make the connection.
Phasing out fossil fuels means that today’s production is the peak, and that from here on out extraction and infrastructure must decline over time. (Green Energy Futures/flickr)

How Canada can leave 83 per cent of its oil in the ground and build strong new economies

If Canada chooses to keep its oil in the ground, it doesn’t mean turning off the tap overnight. Skilled trades will be key to winding down the industry and building up new lines of work.
The Denali Highway as it crosses the Susitna River. Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Infrastructure bill passed by Congress promises billions for bridge repair – rural Alaska shows the growing need as temperatures rise

Alaska is warming faster than any other U.S. state, and that’s causing problems, a team of bridge engineers and social scientists explains. The infrastructure bill in Congress would offer some help.
Heat and dryness are leaving high mountain areas more vulnerable to forest fires. David McNew/Getty Images

Western fires are burning higher in the mountains and at unprecedented rates as the climate warms

As the risk of fires rises in areas once considered too wet to burn, it creates hazards for mountain communities and for downstream water supplies.

Most Read past week

  1. The new Global Methane Pledge can buy time while the world drastically reduces fossil fuel use
  2. An insider’s look at the Glasgow climate summit – talks intensify, amid grandstanding and anger outside

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