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In February 2021, a World Health Organization team investigating the origins of COVID-19 visited the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan, China. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Why gain-of-function research matters

The research community is taking a closer look at the lab-leak hypothesis for the origin of COVID-19, prompting discussion about the risks and benefits of engineering viruses.
Political leanings and community features predicted support of COVID-19 mitigation measures. wildpixel/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Our analysis of 7 months of polling data shows friendships, the economy and firsthand experience shaped and reshaped views on COVID-19 risks

Multiple factors determined whether or not individual Americans adopted COVID-19 safety measures, according to statistical analysis of public opinion data.
Shelter-in-place measures have made it more difficult for victims of domestic violence to escape from their abusers. Elizabeth Livermore/Moment via Getty Images

Domestic violence 911 calls increased during lockdown, but official police reports and arrests declined

A change in how witnesses, victims and authorities respond to domestic violence reports paired with limited social services placed victims in a vulnerable position during the pandemic.
Though drug recalls are relatively uncommon in the U.S., reduced inspections increase the likelihood of manufacturing errors that slip through the cracks. AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

The FDA’s weak drug manufacturing oversight overseas is a potentially deadly problem

COVID-19 has exacerbated a backlog of domestic and foreign drug manufacturing inspections that the FDA is still too short-staffed to adequately deal with.
To stop the spread of COVID-19 across the globe, it’s important to understand the evolutionary imperative that viruses have to spread their genetic material. Dazeley/Getty Images

Think like a virus to understand why the pandemic isn’t over yet – and what the US needs to do to help other countries

Viruses want to pass on their genetic material. Recognizing this about SARS-CoV-2 provides insight into how the world is still vulnerable to COVID-19.
A sign shows the way to a recovery area to monitor any immediate side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 17, 2020, in Reno, Nevada. Patrick T. Fallon /AFP via Getty Images

What COVID-19 vaccine side effects might I expect?

Many people never experience the least bit of discomfort from the COVID-19 vaccines, but mild side effects are common. They include swelling in the affected arm, nausea and chills.
A COVID-19 patient in an ICU unit in a hospital in Capetown, South Africa, in December 2020. A variant emerged in South Africa that has since spread to other parts of the world. Other new variants could emerge elsewhere. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

How worried should you be about coronavirus variants? A virologist explains his concerns

As the US vaccinates millions more people each day, the novel coronavirus works to survive. It does this by mutating. So far, several variants are worrisome. A virologist explains what they are.

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