COVID-19 – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Pairing widespread testing with fast, effective contact tracing is considered essential for controlling the coronavirus’s spread as the U.S. passes 100,000 deaths. AP Images/Rick Bowmer

How coronavirus contact tracing works in a state Dr. Fauci praised as a model to follow

Since the state's first coronavirus case surfaced, trained case investigators have traced the contacts of every person who tested positive. Here's what else South Carolina got right.
Some of the highest coronavirus hospitalization rates in Denver are in neighborhoods near Valverde, a community that was once redlined. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images

Is your neighborhood raising your coronavirus risk? Redlining decades ago set communities up for greater danger

Neighborhood characteristics like pollution from busy roads, widespread public transit use and lack of community-based health care are putting certain communities at greater risk from COVID-19.
New research hints at why Germany’s death toll from COVID-19 was relatively low while Italy’s and America’s spiked. Piero Cruciatti/AFP/Getty Images

Fast-acting countries cut their coronavirus death rates while US delays cost thousands of lives

Over the first 100 days of the pandemic, countries that quickly implemented strong policies successfully lowered their death rates faster. There were also some surprises in the successes and failures.
A restaurant in Bangkok created plastic partitions and moved its tables farther apart to separate guests in a normally tight space. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

How to lower your coronavirus risk while eating out: Restaurant advice from an infectious disease expert

It's hard to eat while wearing a face mask, and social distancing isn't easy in restaurants' normally tight quarters. An infectious disease expert offers some tips on what to look for to stay safe.
The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment of uncertainty, fear and despair – emotions that erode mental health. AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy

A perfect storm for medical PTSD: Isolation, intensive care and the coronavirus pandemic

COVID-19 patients are spending weeks in intensive care units, isolated and alone, knowing they have a disease that doctors don't fully understand. It's a recipe for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Emergency rooms across the country are seeing sharp drops in the number of patients seeking care for problems other than COVID-19. AAron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

‘I thought I could wait this out’: Fearing coronavirus, patients are delaying hospital visits, putting health and lives at risk

Delaying medical care comes at a cost, both human and financial. The patients some emergency rooms have been seeing are a lot sicker and more likely to need hospitalization.
As larger percentages of the U.S. population become infected, a study shows how direct medical expenses for treating COVID-19 will rise. Those costs will come back to everyone. Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Coronavirus medical costs could soar into hundreds of billions as more Americans become infected

Reopening state economies too soon risks a second wave of the pandemic, and a surge in medical costs. Anyone who pays insurance premiums and taxes will be picking up the tab.
The Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, had the first known COVID-19 outbreak in a U.S. nursing home. In Massachusetts, one-third of nursing homes now have more than 30 COVID-19 cases. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

Failure to count COVID-19 nursing home deaths could dramatically skew US numbers

The government doesn't know how many people have died of COVID-19, in part because it didn't require nursing homes to report cases to the CDC. In some states, over half of deaths are in nursing homes.
In the rural South, chronic illnesses are common, the population is older and health care options have been declining as hospitals close. All put the population at higher risk from COVID-19. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Coronavirus is spreading through rural South’s high-risk population – reopening economies will make it worse

Southern governors are starting to reopen their economies at the same time COVID-19 cases are spreading through the rural South.
When leaders make public health decisions, such as how long social distancing should be maintained to reduce the coronavirus death toll, they often use mathematical models. The numbers aren’t always as simple as they seem. Alex Brandon/AP

Why coronavirus death rates can’t be summed up in one simple number

A lot of numbers are being tossed around about COVID-19 and what to expect in the future. They're being used to make critical public health decisions, but they aren't as simple as they appear.