Education – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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The revelry that comes with college football comes with a serious social cost. Sergey Nivens/www.shutterstock.com

Big game days in college football linked with sexual assault

Reports of sexual assault increase by as much as 41 percent when the local college football team plays, according to researchers who say the increase is related to the drinking culture on campus.
Teacher turnover causes significant disruptions to the school year, researchers say. Rob Marmion/www.shutterstock.com

Teacher turnover is a problem – here’s how to fix it

About 16 percent of all teachers change schools or leave teaching. Often, these changes occur in the middle of the school year, which causes significant setbacks in learning, researchers say.
Black students who express an interest in racial justice are less likely to get a response from predominantly white, private liberal arts colleges, new research shows. AshTproductions/www.shutterstock.com

Black student activists face penalty in college admissions

New research by sociologist Ted Thornhill shows that black students who indicate they plan to fight for racial justice are more likely to be ignored by white admissions counselors.
A Texas school’s tribute to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Why there’s so much inconsistency in school shooting data

The Department of Education says there were 240 school shootings during a recent school year. Another database only counts 29. How could the numbers be so different -- and who is right?
Collaboration across disciplines is key to solving the world’s toughest problems, researchers argue. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Want to solve the world’s problems? Try working together across disciplines

Labor Day is an excellent time for college instructors to commit to teaching students to take an interdisciplinary approach to solving the world's toughest problems, three professors argue.
Has the cost of higher education in the U.S. put college out of financial reach? DRogatnev/www.shutterstock.com

Making college more affordable

As students head back to campus, the ever higher cost of a college education is once again top of mind. The presidents of Colorado College, Penn State and Xavier University weigh in on what's to be done.
Black power militant H. Rap Brown and Stokely Carmichael (right) appeared at a sit-in protest at Columbia University in New York City on April 26, 1968. AP

1968 protests at Columbia University called attention to ‘Gym Crow’ and got worldwide attention

The 1968 protests at Columbia University led the institution to abandon a gym project that residents considered racist and cut off its defense work – and generated worldwide attention in the process.
Protesters toppled the ‘Silent Sam’ Confederate statue on Aug. 20 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Gerry Broome/AP

Tearing down Confederate statues leaves structural racism intact

Toppling statues devoted to Confederate soldiers may be a joyous moment for protesters who fight white supremacy, but after the statues fall, structural racism remains, a scholar on slavery argues.
While textbooks have been said to be on their way, they are still a mainstay in higher education. SayHope/www.shutterstock.com

Despite predictions of their demise, college textbooks aren’t going away

Although textbooks are often said to be on their way out, their usefulness in the transmission of knowledge suggest textbooks won't be obsolete anytime soon, the author of a book on textbooks argues.
Just as the printing press made books more affordable, technology could do the same thing for college textbooks today. ju_see/www.shutterstock.com

Could college textbooks soon get cheaper?

An English and economics professor explain why America's college textbook industry might undergo radical change that makes books more affordable, similar to what happened in medieval times.
Brains vs. brawn: Does big-time college sports value black student-athletes? Brynn Anderson/AP

Dangerous stereotypes stalk black college athletes

Although University of Maryland football player Jordan McNair died from heatstroke during practice, his death also resulted from a culture that exploits black players, says a professor who studies race and sports.
Up to two-thirds of students experience ‘ninth grade shock,’ which can affect everything from grades to mental health. ABO Photography/www.shutterstock.com

The start of high school doesn’t have to be stressful

While transitioning to the ninth grade can be stressful for many students, teaching students to be more optimistic can better enable them to cope with the challenges, research psychologists argue.
Historically, many American universities helped lay the foundation for eugenics, a pseudoscience used to justify racism. Helioscribe/www.shutterstock.com

For universities, making the case for diversity is part of making amends for racist past

Since US universities once stood at the forefront of the eugenics movement and its racist ideas, they should right the wrongs of the past by pursuing diversity on campus, two scholars argue.
Racial minorities face profiling on campus. Mr. Doomits/www.shutterstock.com

Smith College incident is latest case of racial ‘profiling by proxy’

An incident in which a Smith College employee called police on a black student who 'seemed out of place' is just the latest in a string of cases of racial 'profiling by proxy,' three scholars argue.