Education – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Several school systems have become engulfed in cheating scandals as of late. Is the pressure to boost school performance becoming too much? Lightspring/Shutterstock

Why school leaders fake academic success

An education professor, who worked as a teacher in Atlanta Public Schools during a cheating scandal that began in 2009, explains what factors and forces lead educators to fake academic success.
A student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida speaks to reporters on Feb. 14 after a former student fatally shot multiple people. AP/Wilfredo Lee

Here’s how witnessing violence harms children’s mental health

When children learn about news like the deadly school shooting in Florida, a logical question for them to ask is: Will the same thing happen to me?
Several recent cheating scandals have rocked some of America’s most prestigious high schools. Shutterstock.com

Why students at prestigious high schools still cheat on exams

Despite embarrassing publicity about cheating at top US high schools, academic dishonesty remains a problem. Could focusing on mastery instead of test scores help mitigate the problem?
Parents wait for news after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. AP/Joel Auerbach

Why security measures won’t stop school shootings

When school shootings take place, beefed up security is often seen as a solution. Experience shows, however, that school shootings stem from social factors that require a different response.
Anxiety and depression are the top reasons that college students seek counseling, a new report shows. Shutterstock.com

1 in 5 college students have anxiety or depression. Here’s why

On the heels of a new report that shows depression and anxiety are the top reasons college students seek counseling, a psychiatry professor lists a variety of factors behind the trend.
A new study reveals that students gain an appreciation for views across the political spectrum during their first year in college. Shutterstock.com

Does college turn people into liberals?

Despite claims that college turns students liberal, a new study reveals that students gain more appreciation for both liberal and conservative views during their freshman year.
Florida Gulf Coast University professor Ted Thornhill discusses his course on ‘White Racism.’ Aaron Nunes-Zaller

Why I teach a course called ‘White Racism’

Controversy ignited when a Florida Gulf Coast University professor began teaching a 'white racism' course this year. Ted Thornhill says his course is rooted in a 'damning body' of evidence.
Many college students who take calculus fail to earn a C or better. Could ‘active learning’ help turn things around? pixabay

Why colleges must change how they teach calculus

Each year large numbers of college students drop plans to become engineers or scientists because of poor performance in calculus. A new 'active learning' approach could help turn things around.
New research concludes that there are many “Lost Einsteins” in America – children who had the ability to become inventors but didn’t because of where they were born. Shutterstock.com

How talented kids from low-income families become America’s ‘Lost Einsteins’

A new analysis shows how family background influences who grows up to invent. The key to turning things around? Expose kids to more inventors.
U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos wipes her brow during an October 2017 appearance in Bellevue, Wash. AP/Ted S. Warren

DeVos speech shows contempt for the agency she heads

US Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos's anti-Washington rhetoric represents a radical departure from that of previous education secretaries.
First lady Melania Trump, Queen Rania of Jordan and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos talk with students at the Excel Academy Public Charter School last April. Principal Dana Bogle, on left. AP / Pablo Martinez Monsivais

What we can learn from closure of charter school that DeVos praised as ‘shining example’

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos once called Excel Academy Public Charter School a 'shining example.' A Vanderbilt scholar explains why that description was woefully off target.
In 2016, James Edwards, right, poses with fellow residents at the Plymouth Crossroads youth homeless residence in Lancaster, N.Y., as he prepares to leave for college. Edwards finished high school while homeless. AP/Carolyn Thompson

The hidden homelessness among America’s high school students

Roughly 700,000 students ages 13 to 17 have experienced homelessness in the last year. An education researcher says the obstacles that these students face can threaten their college dreams.
Students from this 2016 photo work at computers inside Buffalo’s Bennett High School – one of five high schools being redesigned with a focus on specialty programming, such as computer science or solar energy. The goal is to position students to land well-paying jobs being created amid a surge in economic development in the city. Carolyn Thompson/AP

‘Career ready’ out of high school? Why the nation needs to let go of that myth

Unlike the days of old, career and technical education in today's high schools doesn't really prepare students for work. Researchers at Georgetown University explain why CTE must be revamped.
More and more students at Harvard are examining their admission files to try to understand how they got in. The U.S. government is also plans to examine the files as part of a discrimination case filed by 63 Asian- American groups. Shutterstock.com

You’re not going to get accepted into a top university on merit alone

Students and government officials alike hope Harvard's admission files will yield clues about who gets in and why, but a Harvard researcher says their efforts will be in vain.