Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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One in 3 people with severe depression do not respond to treatment. TZIDO SUN/Shutterstock.com

Promising new drug for treatment-resistant depression – esketamine

A safety committee convened by the FDA has declared esketamine safe for severe depression. But isn't this drug the same as ketamine, an illegal street drug? A medical anthropologist explains.
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth II at a horse show in 2018. On Jan. 17, 2019, Prince Philip crashed his Land Rover into another vehicle. 22/KGC-178-STAR MAX/IPx 2018/AP Photo

How old is too old to drive?

Britain's Prince Philip recently announced he will stop driving, in the aftermath of a crash he caused after being blinded by sunlight. The crash raises a question: When should people stop driving?
Having cancer is bad enough, and dealing with the costs and confusion of billing systems makes things harder. KieferPix/Shutterstock.com

Confusing and high bills for cancer patients add to anxiety and suffering

A cancer diagnosis is one of the scariest of all. The pain and fear are worsened by a confusing landscape of bills, opaque billing systems and changing insurance rules, rates and reimbursements.
Policymakers and consumers are well aware of rising pharmaceuticals prices. AP Photo/Elise Amendola

Why the US has higher drug prices than other countries

The Trump administration's proposal to lower drug prices focuses on discounts. A health policy scholar argues that the US could learn from Europe's system of measuring drug value and effectiveness.
Cancer survivors are honored at a Relay for Life Event in Twinsburg, Ohio, in June 2009. Researchers found that many survivors do not like that label. Kenneth Sponsler/Shutterstock.com

People diagnosed with cancer often don’t embrace the term ‘survivor’

A recent study found that many people who have survived a cancer diagnosis do not like to be called 'survivor.' As World Cancer Day is observed on Feb. 4, their wishes are something to think about.
This is a model of the adenovirus type 5 which causes respiratory infections. Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com

Potential treatment for eye cancer using tumor-killing virus

When you think of viruses, you might think of the horrible illnesses they cause, like flu or Ebola. But now researchers are learning how to use the unique traits of viruses to treat disease.
New Orleans Saints fans cheer on Jan. 20, 2019, in the playoff game with the Los Angeles Rams in New Orleans. Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo

How to avoid a Super Bowl injury to your voice

In the excitement of the Super Bowl and other major sporting events, fans often forget themselves – and their voices. Loud cheering can stress your vocal folds, or voice cords. An expert explains.
A sign at a clinic in Vancouver, Washington on Jan. 25, 2019 asks unvaccinated children 12 and younger to leave the facility. Gillian Flaccus/AP Photos

Measles: Why it’s so deadly, and why vaccination is so vital

A measles outbreak is causing major concern in a Washington county where only 22 percent of children are vaccinated against the disease. A vaccine expert explains the risks.
A pedestrian crosses a street bundled up against the subzero temperatures carried by a polar vortex. Stringer/Reuters

What is frostbite? An ER doc explains

Layering on winter gear is annoying. But with temperatures reaching minus 50 in some parts of the country, it is essential to protect your skin from frostbite, which can happen in minutes.
A man at a recovery center in Youngstown, Ohio, smokes a cigarette, June 15, 2017. David Dermer/AP Photo

Who’s smoking now, and why it matters

For those who don't smoke cigarettes, the dangers may seem distant. Yet smoking still kills millions each year. A new study suggests that e-cigarettes might curb this public health tragedy.
CBD, made from hemp, is being hyped as treatment for pain, nausea and a variety of maladies. But studies so far do not show benefit in humans. ElRoi/Shutterstock.com

CBD: Rising star or popular fad?

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is being touted in popular culture as a miracle cure-all. From creams to gummies and more, CBD has exploded onto the health scene. But what does the science actually say?
Many patients are surprised to learn what their health care procedures cost. 9dream studio/shutterstock.com

What would happen if hospitals openly shared their prices?

Hospitals are now required to post their prices online. This approach is unlikely to change US health care – but better price transparency tools could actually reduce costs.
Travelers at Miami International Airport on Jan. 18, 2019 wait in long lines, in part due to the government shutdown. Lynne Sladky/AP Photo

Stressed out by shutdown chaos? 4 evidence-based tools to help you cope

The stressful political climate worsened with the shutdown of the federal government. And even though a break may be in sight, even the uncertainty adds stress. A neuroscientist offers ways to cope.
Many parents object to vaccination for religious reasons, while others may file for exemptions for convenience. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

A proposal to reduce vaccine exemptions while respecting rights of conscience

Recent measles outbreaks show the dangers of not vaccinating – and the importance of vaccination. Is there a way to accommodate those religiously opposed to vaccination and minimize other exemptions?
Antibiotic-resistant germs can thrive in the presence of these drugs. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

How to train the body’s own cells to combat antibiotic resistance

Our bodies have a set of defenses that are finely tuned for killing invading microbes. With rising cases of drug-resistant bacteria, maybe boosting our natural defenses is the best medicine.