Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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A couple in bed. Research shows that sex is important to happiness and good health. 4 pm production/Shutterstock.com

Consensual sex is key to happiness and good health, science says

Love may make the world go round, but sex keeps it going. There's been a lot of discussion in recent months about the horrors of bad sex. But it's important to remember that good sex is good for us.
A CDC scientist measures the amount of H7N9 avian flu virus grown in a lab. James Gathany/CDC/Handout via REUTERS

3 ways the US should prepare for the next flu pandemic

Science has come a long way in the 100 years since the worst flu pandemic in history. But that doesn't mean that the country is ready for another health disaster.
In this March 18, 2011 photo, Cassidy Hempel waved at hospital staff as she was being treated for a rare disorder. Her mother Chris, left, fought to gain permission for an experimental drug. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

What is ‘right to try,’ and could it help?

The 'right to try' legislation is a political winner. But will it give terminally patients the help they need or only bring false hope?
A teen looking out of a window. Research shows that traumatic events in childhood can affect children as they mature and limit their education, which in turn can harm their health. Jan Andersen/Shutterstock.com

How childhood experiences contribute to the education-health link

Adverse childhood events can not only cause lasting psychological effects but also learning problems. That, in turn, worsens health outcomes, as literacy is an integral part of health care.
Vivitrol, a non-opioid medication, is used to treat some cases of opioid dependence. Addiction specialists stress that not all patients need medication, but that many do. AP Photo/Carla K. Carlson

Why treating addiction with medication should be carefully considered

The U.S. has had multiple drug epidemics, and, until recently, has not had evidence-tested ways to help people. That has changed. New medicines can help. But other medical issues should also be addressed.
In this Dec. 3, 2014 photo, liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano talks to an oncology nurse at a hospital in Clackamas, Ore. AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka

How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

Great strides have been made in cancer care over the past decades. As World Cancer Day on Feb. 4 approaches, it's important to note the growing role that kindness and empathy play in good care.
A Syrian child drew a picture of helicopters dropping bombs and children dying as a result. The surviving children are crying, while the deceased ones have smiles on their faces. Zaher Sahloud

Why ignoring mental health needs of young Syrian refugees could harm us all

Syrian refugee children are not getting the care they need in the wake of the trauma they have endured. Here's why that's bad for them and bad for the rest of the world.
The drug GHB gained notoriety during raves decades ago, but it is resurfacing again. Anthony Mooney/Shutterstock.com

The comeback and dangers of the drug GHB

The recent death of 'Storm Chaser' star Joel Taylor, reportedly because of his use of the GHB, is a tragic reminder of the drug's dangerous impact.
People collect water piped in from a mountain creek in Utuado, Puerto Rico on Oct. 14, 2017, in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans were still without running water. AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa

Why climate change is worsening public health problems

Climate change threatens to widen the health gap between the haves and have-nots. Here's why addressing environmental issues that drive poor health is a starting point.
Donnie Cardenas, on bed, waits with his roommate Torrey Jewett at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., Jan. 10, 2018. Cardenas had the flu. AP Photo/Greg Bull

4 things you need to know right now to protect yourself from the flu

The flu is not only making millions of people sick this year. It's causing fear and, along with it, a lot of confusion. Should you get a flu shot? Should you see the doctor? An expert advises.
Tammie Jackson, looking at the prescription drugs she could not obtain before enrolling in Montana’s expanded Medicaid program, in the summer of 2017. AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan

Medicaid work requirements could cost the government more in the long run

The new rules Kentucky and other states want to impose could leave millions of Americans who benefit from this safety net program uninsured – and resorting to the emergency room for their health care.
Funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) has run out. stockcreations/shutterstock.com

Time to stop using 9 million children as a bargaining CHIP

Funding for a children's health insurance program ran out at the end of last September. Despite the program's clear benefits, plans to renew it have been caught in partisan bickering.