Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Healthy aging is a new norm, researchers say, with older adults having a new name and attitude. By YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock.com

As life expectancies rise, so are expectations for healthy aging

The age of the US is increasing, and with it, new expectations of health and happiness. Is the US prepared for the wave of baby boomers who will live long and want to be as healthy as they do?
Falls are the No. 1 cause of accidental death in people 65 and older and a major cause of disability. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age’s most dangerous events

Saturday isn't just the first day of fall. It's also the 10th annual National Falls Prevention Awareness Day. Falls are a major cause of disability in seniors. Experts explain ways to prevent them.
Vinegar has become as popular for some as nectar of the gods. It has a long history of high hopes for healing. Koy_Hipster/Shutterstock.com

Is apple cider vinegar good for you? A doctor weighs in

Does it seem like everyone you know drinks apple cider vinegar, mainly in hopes of losing weight? Vinegar has a long history of high hopes attached to it. A doctor who loves vinegar explains.
Many plastics that used BPA have now replaced it with substitutes like BPS, a related molecule that may have just as many health issues. skhunda/Shutterstock.com

Study shows BPA substitutes may cause same health issues as the original

BPA, used widely in plastics and as a liner in food cans, was replaced by a related chemical called BPS. But it seems that this substitute may also harm eggs and sperm and disrupt hormones.
Breast cancer type 1 (BRCA1) is a human tumor suppressor gene, found in all humans. Its protein, also called by the synonym BRCA1, is responsible for repairing DNA. ibreakstock/Shutterstock.com

Gene-editing technique CRISPR identifies dangerous breast cancer mutations

Mutations in BRCA genes are linked to the early onset of breast and ovarian cancers. But the effect of most mutations is unclear. Now new research can distinguish harmless from dangerous mutations.
Death by suicide isn’t always related to depression. Relationship, job and legal problems can give rise to feelings of hopelessness. Six screening questions may help. PHotograhee.eu

6 questions you can ask a loved one to help screen for suicide risk

Death by suicide has increased at an alarming rate in recent decades. With September being Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, an expert offers screening questions that even laypeople can use.
The circadian rhythm is present in every single cell of your body, guided by the central clock that resides in the brain. Creations/Shutterstock.com

Simple blood test could read people’s internal clock

Everybody has a personal internal clock in their brain that dictates when we feel like eating, waking and sleeping. But what happens when our life doesn't match our body clock? And how do we read it?
Students at Hampton University celebrate at graduation on May 9. 2010. Studies suggest, however, that the benefits African American students accrue from education will be fewer than those of whites. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Why it’s hard for blacks to pull themselves up by bootstraps when it comes to health

Many in the US believe that all people can gain riches and education simply by working hard. Here's why that is not true for those have been denied rights and privileges for generations.
Electronic medical records could be shared between health systems, allowing doctors to share information and possibly improve care. Tero Vesalainen/Shutterstock.com

It’s 2018. Do you know where your medical records are?

What if you never had to pick up a medical record or image from one doctor to take to another? That capability already exists, but it's not being well-utilized. Here's a look at why.
People with anorexia nervosa often see themselves as overweight when in fact they are not. This image depicts a young, thin woman who sees herself as larger than she is. Tatyana Dzemileva/Shutterstock.com

Anorexia more stubborn to treat than previously believed, analysis shows

Anorexia nervosa can be a deadly disease. A recent analysis of several studies showed that it may be even harder to treat than previously believed. But the news isn't all bad.
This photo provided by New York Police Department shows packets of synthetic marijuana seized after a search warrant was served at a newsstand in Brooklyn, New York. New York Police Department/AP Photo

Why synthetic marijuana is so risky

Synthetic cannabinoids are laboratory-synthesized versions of THC – the active molecule in marijuana. But these copy-cat drugs which can sicken and kill are far more dangerous and unpredictable.
Sen. John McCain pictured at a rally Oct. 15, 2014 in Marietta, Georgia to support Senate candidate David Perdue, who was elected a few weeks later. John Amis/AP Photo

Why McCain and all POWs deserve our profound respect and gratitude

Prisoners of war experience trauma, torture, humiliation and profound loneliness. A trauma psychologist explains how the effects can be lasting – and that Americans' gratitude should also be.
More than 100 million American suffer from chronic pain – in which pain signals continue in the nervous system for weeks, months, or even years. pathdoc/Shutterstock.com

Chronic pain after trauma may depend on what stress gene variation you carry

Did you know that trauma, even when there is no tissue or nerve damage, can cause chronic pain? Exactly how much pain and who is most vulnerable depends on which 'stress genes' we carry.
Sen. John McCain pictured on July 27, 2017. McCain returned to Washington after surgery for glioblastoma to cast a ‘no’ vote to a Republican-backed bill to repeal Obamacare. Cliff Owen/AP Photo

Glioblastoma topples an American hero, but researchers will continue the fight

John McCain was known as a tough fighter and patriot, refusing to yield to his captors' torture while he was imprisoned as a POW. In the end, cancer claimed him. Researchers say progress is coming.
A group of basketball players talking and appearing to have fun. A recent study showed that college athletes benefited from special counseling designed for them. bernard/Shutterstock.com

Could the future edge in college sports be mental wellness?

Student athletes may sometimes be put on a pedestal, but they experience problems just like any student. They sometimes may be harder to reach, however. A novel program suggests a winning approach.