Health + Medicine – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams demonstrates the proper procedure for administering a nasal injection of naloxone on reporter Jennifer Lott, left, during a visit to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss., May 17, 2018. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Naloxone remains controversial to some, but here’s why it shouldn’t be

A recent study argues that naloxone increases opioid use because it protects against death from overdose. Could the number one public health tool to fight the overdose epidemic be making it worse?
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, President Donald Trump and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras before the NATO summit in Brussels July 11, 2018. AP Photo/Ludovic Marin

Reeling from the news? Train your brain to feel better with these 4 techniques

The relentless news cycle has many people feeling overwhelmed and stressed, wondering how to calm their lives and stay healthy. Here are some tips from neuoscience that may help.
This African woman suffers from an autoimmune disease called vitiligo which causes the loss of skin pigment. By andreonegin/shutterstock.com

New treatment in the works for disfiguring skin disease, vitiligo

An autoimmune disease called vitiligo causes white spots to appear on the body, in some cases completely erasing an individual's pigmentation. But a new therapy is on the horizon.
Individuals using indoor tanning are exposed to two types of UV rays – UVA and UVB – that damage skin and DNA and can lead to cancer, including the deadliest one: melanoma. Young users are most at risk. By Rido/shutterstock.com

Health clubs using tanning beds to attract members despite cancer risks, new study shows

Many gyms use free tanning beds to lure in new members who are eager to look and feel their best. But this, argues Sherry Pagoto, runs against the health lifestyle premise these gyms are advocating.
Hope and goals for the future, such as graduating from college, can help protect teens from turning to violence. Georgia State University

How a positive outlook on the future may protect teens from violence

Teens who have high hopes for the future were less likely to threaten or injure someone with a weapon, a recent study reports. Could helping youth build dreams for the future also curb violence?
Bright sun and fatty foods are a bad recipe for your DNA. By Tish1/shutterstock.com

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

Scientists have long thought that regions of DNA called telomeres control how long you live. We are now learning that it is your diet and lifestyle that shape your telomeres, not the other way around.
Vaccinations have saved countless lives and untold suffering, even though many adults still believe vaccines are bad for their children. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

Vaccines have long been considered safe, but many people still believe they are not. A new study shows that people who think they know more than medical experts are more likely to believe that vaccine are not safe.
A mother breastfeeding her infant. Breast milk is considered the best source of nutrition for babies. Lopolo/Shutterstock.com

Breastfeeding has been the best public health policy throughout history

As US mothers returned to breastfeeding, the market for infant formula dried up, leading formula makers to seek new markets in developing nations. Here's how that led to a recent outcry.
Knowing what to say to someone who has lost a loved one by suicide can help survivors. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Mourning death by suicide: How you can provide support for the bereaved

Survivors of those who have died by suicide have special needs that many people do not quite understand. An expert in grief offers ways to be a helpful, healing presence and avoid saying things that will hurt.
A technician holds a blood sample that tested positive for the hepatitis B virus. Jarun Ontakrai/shutterstock.com

A rare instance when preventative screening is worth the dollar cost

A new analysis shows that the US health care system will save money in the long run by screening people born in Asia and Africa for the hepatitis B virus, which causes liver cancer and cirrhosis.
People ages 50-64 begin to develop chronic conditions for which they need coverage. Doing away with insurance for pre-existing conditions puts this group at risk. Syda Productions/Shutterstock.com

Pre-existing conditions: The age group most vulnerable if coverage goes away

Stripping away preexisting conditions coverage would have far-reaching effects, but 50- to 64-year-olds are most vulnerable. Ignoring medical issues at that age could mean sicker oldsters later on.
Clostridium difficile bacteria causes diarrhea and inflammation of the colon. By Kateryna Kon/shutterstock.com

A novel ‘smart’ antibiotic may target most common bacterial infection contracted in US hospitals

A new type of antibiotic uses DNA to fight a common deadly microbe, Clostridium difficile. These new drugs are inexpensive and adaptable and can be modified to target any bacterium, lowering the chance of drug resistance.
Medical social workers perform many tasks for patients, but the work is taking a high toll on them, leading to burnout and attrition. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock

When caring hurts: Attrition among social workers, medicine’s unsung heroes

Medical social workers coordinate care, an especially important job in complicated cases. Just as nurses and doctors are feeling burned out, these unsung heroes are feeling the burn, too. Here's why that's dangerous.
Pro-life and pro-choice protesters rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court in June. REUTERS/Toya Sarno Jordan

How Roe v. Wade changed the lives of American women

Over the past 45 years, women have married later, attained higher education and joined the workforce in record numbers. Could it all be turned back?
Kristen Bell, who has battled depression, has shared her experience of surviving it and thriving. She is pictured here at the 2017 NBCUniversal Upfront in New York on May 15, 2017. JStone/Shutterstock.com

Thriving after depression: Why are scientists ignoring good outcomes?

New research suggests that people who previously suffered from depression can thrive and live happier lives than before. Why aren't more people aware of that?
The vine Banisteriopsis caapi is one ingredient in ayahuasca, a psychedelic brew that Amazonian indigenous populations have long used for spiritual purposes. Apollo/flickr

Amazonian psychedelic may ease severe depression, new study shows

Ayahuasca has long been used for indigenous healing and spiritual rituals. Now, a Brazilian clinical trial has confirmed that this psychoactive drink can help those with even severe depression.