Home – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

Displaying 551 - 575 of 11109 articles

Protesters in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on April 20 call for the governor to lift restrictions meant to help combat the spread of the coronavirus. AP Photo/Matt Slocum

What are the ‘reopen’ protesters really saying?

A scholar of social participation finds shared themes across protests in many states, not all of which fit common popular or media narratives about the events.
Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, right, has his temperature taken as he arrives at Ruhenda airport in Butembo in eastern Congo, June 15, 2019. AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro

Why the WHO, often under fire, has a tough balance to strike in its efforts to address health emergencies

The World Health Organization is not a disease police force but more of a diplomatic group, aiming to bring countries together to stop disease. Still, it comes under fierce attack.
During coronavirus lockdowns, gardens have served as an escape from feelings of alienation. Richard Bord/Getty Images

The impulse to garden in hard times has deep roots

What drives people to garden isn't the fear of hunger so much as hunger for physical contact – and a longing to engage in work that is real.
Apps that warn about close contact with COVID-19 cases are key to relaxing social distancing rules. Walter Bibikow/Stone via Getty Images

How Apple and Google will let your phone warn you if you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus

Bluetooth wireless communication makes it possible for people to get alerts on their phones when they've been exposed to the coronavirus. Adding the right cryptography scheme keeps those alerts private.
No one knows what kicked off the Big Bang that eventually allowed the stars to begin forming. Adolf Schaller for STScI

How could an explosive Big Bang be the birth of our universe?

The term 'Big Bang' might make you think of a massive explosion. Put the thought out of your head. Rather than an explosion, it was the start of everything in the universe.
A group of refugees living on the pavement near the Cape Town Central Police Station on the first day of a national coronavirus lockdown, March 27, 2020 in Cape Town, South Africa. Getty/Nardus Engelbrecht/ Gallo Images

Refugees tell stories of problems – and unity – in facing the coronavirus

From getting schooling for their children through an app in the wrong language to trouble finding gloves and masks, refugees across the globe face different challenges in dealing with the coronavirus.
A Rhode Island National Guardsman and a police officer speak with a man whose car has a New York license plate as part of coronavirus lockdown efforts. AP Photo/David Goldman

Language differences spark fear amid the coronavirus pandemic

Fear of strangers extends beyond racism and discrimination against people who look like they might come from another place – it includes people who sound different, too.
When deadly tornadoes struck the Southeast in April, residents in Prentiss, Mississippi, struggled to keep up coronavirus precautions while salvaging what they could from their damaged properties. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Can your community handle a natural disaster and coronavirus at the same time?

If the forecasts are right, the US could be facing more natural disasters this year – on top of the coronavirus pandemic. Local governments aren't prepared.
Valley of the Dawn members celebrate ‘Day of the Indoctrinator’ at their temple complex in Brazil on May 1. This year’s event is postponed due to coronavirus. Márcia Alves

Brazilian mystics say they’re sent by aliens to ‘jump-start human evolution’ – but their vision for a more just society is not totally crazy

Brazil's Valley of the Dawn faith is often dismissed as a cult. But many of the group's fantastical rituals are a recognizable reaction to this harsh world of inequality, loneliness and pandemics.
For centuries, indigenous history has been largely told through a European lens. John White, circa 1585-1593, © The Trustees of the British Museum

Archaeologists have a lot of dates wrong for North American indigenous history – but we’re using new techniques to get it right

Modern dating techniques are providing new time frames for indigenous settlements in Northeast North America, free from the Eurocentric bias that previously led to incorrect assumptions.