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Science + Technology – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

Displaying 1 - 25 of 2035 articles

A tiger’s vertical stripes help it blend in with trees and grasses in its homelands in Asia. Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images

Why do tigers have stripes?

How do tigers – a top predator – successfully hunt their prey when they have bright orange fur? The secret's in their stripes!
Cellular networks have improved rapidly over the last few decades. moodboard via Getty Images

What’s cellular about a cellphone?

A professor of wireless communications explains the origins of cellular networks and how they evolved into today's 5G networks.
Geese fly day or night, depending on when conditions are best. sharply_done/E+ via Getty Images

How do geese know how to fly south for the winter?

Geese honk loudly and point their bills toward the sky when they're ready to start the migration. Here's how they know it's time, how they navigate and how they conserve energy on the grueling trip.
People lose faith in science when it takes a political side. AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public’s trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.
Pfizer stock surged higher on Nov. 9 after the company announced its vaccine is “90% effective” against COVID-19 infections. KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images

Why we didn’t get a vaccine by Election Day – but why we may get one soon

With COVID-19 cases soaring across the US and worldwide, the need for a vaccine could not be greater. Here's where we stand on vaccine development, including positive results from Pfizer's trial.
When science and anecdote share a podium, you must decide how to value each. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Conservatives value personal stories more than liberals do when evaluating scientific evidence

How much weight would you put on a scientist's expertise versus the opinion of a random stranger? People on either end of the political spectrum decide differently what seems true.
A starchart by Alexander Jamieson from 1822 showing the constellation Cetus, the Sea Monster. Cetus is located in the region of the sky known as the Water, along with other watery constellations such as Aquarius, Pisces and Eridanus. Buyenlarge/Getty Images

Exoplanets are still out there – a new model tells astronomers where to look for more using 4 simple variables

New mathematical technique enables astronomers to predict the whereabouts of missing worlds around nearby stars.
The red salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) is a species endemic to the United States. Betty4240/iStock via Getty Images

A skin-eating fungus from Europe could decimate Appalachia’s salamanders – but researchers are working to prevent an outbreak

The Bsal fungus is not yet here in North America, or any place in the Western Hemisphere, but there is concern that the pet trade is the most likely route for introduction here.
Mail-in and absentee ballots, like these being processed by election workers in Pennsylvania, are a subject of misinformation spreading across social media. AP Photo/Matt Slocum

5 types of misinformation to watch out for while ballots are being counted – and after

Election misinformation typically involves false narratives of fraud that include out-of-context or otherwise misleading images and faulty statistics as purported evidence.