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Articles on Aboriginal health

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The town of Wilcannia in the far outback of New South Wales on the banks of the Darling river. shutterstock

COVID in Wilcannia: a national disgrace we all saw coming

The COVID-19 crisis in Wilcannia demonstrates how entrenched neglect has led to a community devastated by the global pandemic.
Here, where the Black Lives Matter movement has brought focus to First Nations people dying in custody, media attention has been episodic and too often absent. Provided by author

Australia’s news media play an important role reminding the country that Black lives still matter

George Floyd’s death and the US Black Lives Matter movement sparked extensive media attention. Why aren’t Australian Indigenous deaths in custody getting the same amount of media coverage?
Crystal Bulumbara, Esther Bulumbara, Claire Smith and Nell Brown. Barunga community, Northern Territory. July 2019. Narritj

Friday essay: voices from the bush – how lockdown affects remote Indigenous communities differently

Researchers report on how COVID-19 is affecting isolated Indigenous communities. Their voices bridge the urban divide, reveal challenges and describe some unexpected bonuses.
Regular exercise reduces the risk of obesity and a number of chronic diseases. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock

Sport can be an important part of Aboriginal culture for women – but many barriers remain

Just one in four Indigenous women play sport or are physically active, with many citing racism, cost and gendered expectations as barriers.
Walpiri Transient Camp, Katherine: Western medicine can’t be expected to work for disadvantaged Indigenous Australians unless housing and social disadvantage are also addressed.

How a rethink of emergency care is closing the gap, one person at a time

A safe home, a working fridge and access to transport are all needed before western medicine has a chance of working in the long term. But a new way of providing care can help.
Around 5% of adults and 90% of babies who contract hepatitis B go on to have life-long infection that can only be managed with regular medication. Ronald Rampsch/Shutterstock

We have a vaccine for hepatitis B but here’s why we still need a cure

Babies in Australia have been vaccinated against hepatitis B since May 2000, but 240,000 Australians still live with the disease.
Coming together with Elders and other community members helped survivors feel connected. It also gave them hope.

‘My mob is telling their story and it makes me feel good’: here’s what Aboriginal survivors of child sexual abuse told us they need

Many Aboriginal survivors of sexual abuse find mainstream counselling inappropriate. But there is a way to help them heal that respects a collective culture, with strong community ties.

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