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Articles on active transport

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In Paris, the major east-west axis, from the Place de la Concorde to the Place de la Bastille, as given a temporary ‘coronapiste’ after the pandemic broke out. Mayor Anne Hidalgo has said that it will become permanent. Mairie de Paris

Can the city cycling boom survive the end of the Covid-19 pandemic?

The need for social distancing sparked a cycling boom, cutting air pollution and boosting city dwellers' mental and physical health. But when the pandemic ends, will it be back to life as usual?
A crowded walkway at Cronulla, NSW, makes it impossible for people to observe physical distancing rules while exercising. Simon Bullard/AAP

Physical distancing is here for a while – over 100 experts call for more safe walking and cycling space

We've all seen the increases in people walking and cycling on shared paths so crowded it's almost impossible to maintain physical distancing. This must be fixed, and quickly.
Many rarely used bikes end up languishing in the shed. peace baby/Shutterstock

Own a bike you never ride? We need to learn how to fail better at active transport

Where bikes are kept is a strong pointer to the place of cycling in the owner's life. Effective active transport policy starts with understanding what stops people using their bikes instead of cars.
Walking accounts for about 90% of all travel in Melbourne city centre, yet pedestrians are allocated only 24% of street space. Adam Calaitzis/Shutterstock

Move away from a car-dominated city looks radical but it’s a sensible plan for a liveable future

A newly released ten-year plan for Melbourne aims for fewer cars, safer streets and more shared spaces. A significant amount of parking and road space would be reallocated to walking and cycling.
The main concern when talking about the liveability of a city like Melbourne should be sustaining the health and well-being of residents. Leonid Andronov/Shutterstock

Seven steps Melbourne can take to regain its ‘liveable city’ crown

Rather than mourn the end of a seven-year reign as 'world's most liveable city', Melbourne could raise its sights to become more liveable, healthy and sustainable for all who live in the city.
Children’s travel needs are a big factor in private car use. Pablo Rogat/Shutterstock

Children in the car era: bad for them and the planet

The private car is the default transport option for many families. This reduces physical activity and increases greenhouse gas emissions, with unhealthy results for their children and the environment.
If cyclist-friendly cities like Copenhagen can offer abundant and conveniently sited parking space for bikes, why not Australian cities? Grey Geezer/Wikimedia

The problem isn’t dockless share bikes. It’s the lack of bike parking

If cities had backed their active transport goals with investment in adequate cycling infrastructure we might not be having the arguments about dockless bikes 'littering' public space.

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