Articles on Alcohol-related harm

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Processes of data collection and analysis being used to decide policy need to be as independent and transparent as possible, particularly on issues as contentious as Sydney’s lockout laws. Subel BhandariEPA/AAP

Sydney lockout laws review highlights vital role of transparent data analysis

The collection and analysis of data used for making policy should be independent and open to ensure public trust in decision-making. The debate over alcohol licensing shows why this matters.
For young women in Queensland, the risk of unwanted sexual attention is high when they go out at night. vchalShutterstock

Unwanted sexual attention plagues young women going out at night

Rates of unwelcome advances haven't changed under Queensland's 'Tackling Alcohol-Fuelled Violence' policies. In one entertainment district, it happened to 26% of women the night they were interviewed.
Queenslanders are drinking heavily when they go out and breathalyser tests show most don’t realise how drunk they are.

Queenslanders are among our heaviest drinkers on nights out, and changing that culture is a challenge

Even after 'Tackling Alcohol-Fuelled Violence' policies took effect in 2016, Queenslanders still drink more heavily on nights out. Reported levels of aggression are higher than in other states too.
Public alarm at alcohol-related violence led the Queensland government to change liquor licensing laws in 2016. The results of a two-year evaluation are now in. Qld Police/AAP

Lessons from Queensland on alcohol, violence and the night-time economy

A comprehensive two-year evaluation of statewide measures introduced in 2016 has shown it's possible to reduce alcohol-related violence while also producing economic benefits.
The clearest change following the introduction of 24-hour public transport was that people were observed to be getting more intoxicated. bbernard/Shutterstock

All-night public transport hasn’t reduced alcohol-related harm in Melbourne

A program aimed at getting people home safely has cost A$300 million but has had little impact, aside from increased intoxication in CBD venues. Rates of assaults and road crashes are much the same.
Steroid use is growing in Australia but not among the usual suspects. Jhong Dizon/Flickr

Scapegoating steroids won’t make for a safer night out

Steroids are easy to scapegoat. Users are viewed as aggressive, violent and mentally unstable, able to snap at any moment and cause great harm to the people around them. Ostensibly, it is this perception…
Measures to reduce alcohol-fuelled violence will take time to really have an effect. ABC TV

Dead Drunk: alcohol, violence and a night in Kings Cross

Two months after the death of 18-year-old Sydney man Daniel Christie, who was punched to the ground on New Year’s Eve, New South Wales Premier Barry O’Farrell introduced a set of measures aimed at improving…

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