Articles on Algorithm transparency

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People who share potential misinformation on Twitter (in purple) rarely get to see corrections or fact-checking (in orange). Shao et al.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

Information on social media can be misleading because of biases in three places – the brain, society and algorithms. Scholars are developing ways to identify and display the effects of these biases.
It can be complicated to teach a computer to detect harassment and threats. Palto/Shutterstock.com

Can Facebook use AI to fight online abuse?

It could seem attractive to try to teach computers to detect harassment, threats and abusive language. But it's much more difficult than it might appear.
Should an algorithm try to guess what gender people are by how they look? all_is_magic/Shutterstock.com

Gender is personal – not computational

It can be unpleasant to be mistaken for someone of a different gender. When an algorithm does it secretly, it's even more concerning – especially for transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

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