Articles on Anthropocene

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The pangolin, one of the most poached animals in the world, could have served as an intermediate host in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to humans. Wahyudi/AFP

Covid-19 or the pandemic of mistreated biodiversity

Covid-19, like other major epidemics, is not unrelated to the biodiversity and climate crisis we are experiencing.
NASA ‘could not imagine the radical effect of seeing the Earth’ from the moon. In the face of a climate catastrophe, we all need to step back and see the Earth again. Bill Anders/NASA/Handout

Friday essay: thinking like a planet - environmental crisis and the humanities

Historical perspective can offer much in this time of ecological crisis,. Many historians are reinventing their traditional scales of space and time to tell different kinds of stories that recognise the unruly power of nature.
Pictured is a slag pile at Broken Hill in New South Wales. Slag is a man-made waste product created during smelting. Anita Parbhakar-Fox

Our ability to manufacture minerals could transform the gem market, medical industries and even help suck carbon from the air

Manufacturing minerals is an expanding field of study. Making more of them could help alleviate various pressures faced by our growing population. But how are they made, and where can they be used?
People have been modifying Earth – as in these rice terraces near Pokhara, Nepal – for millennia. Erle C. Ellis

Surveying archaeologists across the globe reveals deeper and more widespread roots of the human age, the Anthropocene

Hundreds of archaeologists provided on-the-ground data from across the globe, providing a new view of the long and varied history of people transforming Earth's environment.
Plant extinctions have skyrocketed, driven in large part by land clearing and climate change. Graphic Node/Unsplash

Plants are going extinct up to 350 times faster than the historical norm

Human-driven land clearing and climate change are sending plants extinct at a rapid rate, risking a devastating biodiversity crash.
Whooping cranes, a critically endangered species, breed in one location, a wetland in Wood Buffalo National Park. Yet a federal-provincial review panel has approved an oilsands mine that could kill some of the birds. (Shutterstock)

Energy development wins when it’s pitted against endangered species

Are our brains wired to favour growth over environmentally rational decisions?

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