Articles on Art

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Bruce Beresford’s expansive art collection grew from flea-markets. Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956). Exodus (Study for a mural). Photo: Jenni Carter

From the Queen of Sheba to Jeffrey Smart: how art shaped Bruce Beresford

Bruce Beresford can't draw, but he has wept in an art gallery. A lifelong delight in a wide range of art – from paintings to opera – has influenced his craft from a young age.
A electric screen showing Shanghai Pudong financial area in a clear day, is seen amid heavy smog in Shanghai. What can art do to make climate change more real? Aly Song

It’s time for a new age of Enlightenment: why climate change needs 60,000 artists to tell its story

Climate change is such a big problem it's almost impossible for us to really understand. We need artists to mobilise on a huge scale to render the problem comprehensible.
Detail of ‘The Morteratsch Glacier, Upper Engadine Valley, Pontresina,’ by Albert Bierstadt, 1895. Wikiart

Using computers to better understand art

A new field of research aims to deepen, and even quantify, our understanding of artistic style. We use mathematical techniques to help discover novel insights, even in well-studied paintings.
Big Blue Lavender Bay, one of the three paintings at the centre of trial. AAP Image/Genevieve Gannon

Is your artwork genuine and who can you trust to advise you?

The conviction of two men in relation to the sale of forged Brett Whiteley paintings indicates that Australia needs to get its act together when it comes to authenticating artworks.
In our image saturated world we are becoming inured to the iconography of “natural” disasters. Ed Keith/flicker

The poster is political: how artists are challenging climate change

It is hard for us to visualise the trends and processes of climate change, which are largely hidden. But posters - with their richly subversive history - are the perfect medium for prompting contemplation and action.
Australia’s Aboriginal welfare problem of the 60s enabled widespread theft from Indigenous artists – including designs for the one dollar note. Reserve Bank of Australia.

‘Dollar Dave’ and the Reserve Bank: a tale of art, theft and human rights

Australia's original $1 note featured artwork taken without permission from Aboriginal artist, David Malangi. He was later given $1000, a medallion and a fishing kit, but archival evidence sheds new light on the affair.
Why is Whistler’s mother one of the most persistently famous images in the world? James McNeill Whistler, Arrangement in grey and black no. 1 (Portrait of the artist's mother) 1871. Image courtesy of the NGV.

Here’s looking at: ‘Whistler’s Mother’

Whistler's Mother, which arrives in Melbourne on March 25, is one of the most famous portraits in the world. But James Whistler never wanted the sitter's identity known.
William Yang’s beautiful photography crackles with life. All the World’s a Stage, Geoffrey Rush,Exit the King, Belvoir, 2007 © William Yang.

Stories of Love and Death: casting a new light on William Yang

William Yang has, maybe more than anyone else, shaped Sydney's view of itself. A new book, William Yang: Stories of Love and Death, collects his iconic photographs, with scrawled annotations.

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