Articles on Bangladesh

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A market area in Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, crowded with people despite the coronavirus pandemic, May 12, 2020. hmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Megacity slums are incubators of disease – but coronavirus response isn’t helping the billion people who live in them

COVID-19 is spreading fast through not only the world's richest cities but also its poorest, ravaging slum areas where risk factors like overcrowding and poverty accelerate disease transmission.
Kenya’s Supreme Court upholds President Uhuru Kenyatta’s election victory following a re-run in 2017. EFE-EPA/Daniel Irungu

Discrediting elections: why the opposition playbook carries risks

By pushing their usually valid complaints onto the streets and the courts, opposition leaders deny governments the popular goodwill and international credibility they need to govern effectively.
In this 2013 photo, Bangladeshi mourners carry the coffin containing the body of blogger Ahmed Rajib Haider for funeral. AP Photo/Pavel Rahman, File

Conservative Islamic views are gaining ground in secular Bangladesh and curbing freedom of expression

In recent years Bangladesh has seen an increase in attacks on religious minorities. A scholar explains how certain extreme views on how Islam is to be followed are taking center stage in the country.
A narrow river divides Myanmar from Bangladesh, where nearly 1 million now live as refugees. AP Photo/Bernat Armangue

Myanmar charged with genocide of Rohingya Muslims: 5 essential reads

Dozens of Muslim-majority countries are asking the UN's International Criminal Court to investigate and prosecute a 2017 massacre in Myanmar that killed an estimated 10,000 Rohingya Muslims.
Bangladeshi child labourers work at a balloon factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Consumers must demand products made under favourable working conditions. (AP Photo/A.M Ahad)

The end of dangerous working conditions starts with informed consumers

The food we eat and the products we use should not contribute to human misery. While companies hold some blame, so do consumers who avoid dealing with the consequences of their purchasing decisions.
Nimai Hajong and his wife, August 2018. Hajong was born in Bangladesh and moved to India when he was an infant. The 58-year-old, now considered a “foreigner” in his own state, poses with paperwork supporting his right to citizenship. A. Shamar/AFP

How the National Citizenship Registration in Assam is shaping a new national identity in India

On August 31, the final list of the National Register of Citizens (NRC) for the state of Assam, along the India-Bangladesh border will decide upon the future of millions of people in the state.
In this May 2013 photo, residents walk past a cordon of soldiers standing guard at a checkpoint in San Rafael Las Flores, Guatemala, near a mine owned by Tahoe Resources Inc. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

Courts are handcuffed on corporate human rights abuses abroad

Despite a recent Tahoe Resources settlement and apology to Guatemalan protesters, Canadian companies can still get away with crimes committed abroad — even in the face of insurmountable evidence.
A Rohingya refugee girl sells vegetables in Kutupalong refugee camp, Bangladesh. Access to education is extremely limited in the camps, and most children — particularly girls — receive little to no formal education, Aug. 28, 2018. AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Without school, a ‘lost generation’ of Rohingya refugee children face uncertain future

An estimated 500,000 Rohingya children, refugees from Myanmar, are growing up in Bangladesh in overcrowded camps with no access to formal education.
A Rohingya refugee mother protects herself and child with an umbrella carrying the logos of several European aid organisations. EPA-EFE/K M ASAD

Rohingya refugees: focusing only on their return home ignores the crime and health crises in Bangladesh’s camps

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh have been stuck in makeshift camps for years. They are now being targeted by criminal gangs, alongside public health and well-being issues.
A street vendor in Hanoi, Vietnam. Rather than being “helpless and hopeless”, many informal workers are self-reliant and ambitious. Wikimedia

Five myths about the informal economy that need debunking

The informal economy is often perceived negatively, yet recent research from developing and emerging countries indicate that the preconceptions that surround it are myths.
Consumers should ask: “who made my clothes” so that they remember the modern slavery conditions imposed on many garment workers. Shutterstock

Fashion production is modern slavery: 5 things you can do to help now

Fashion Revolution week puts a spotlight on the modern slavery conditions of the fashion industry and encourages fashion consumers to ask, "who made my clothes."

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