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Alzheimer’s disease is an incapacitating, progressive brain disorder that affects the lives of more than 6.5 million Americans. PamelaJoeMcFarlane/E+ via Getty Images

What the FDA’s accelerated approval of a new Alzheimer’s drug could mean for those with the disease – 5 questions answered about lecanemab

In clinical trials, lecanemab slowed disease progression by 27% and reduced the amount of plaque found in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease.
Lecanemab is an antibody that attaches to beta-amyloid proteins accumulated in the brain and allows the immune system to get rid of them. (Shutterstock)

Lecanemab: Experimental drug is a ray of hope for Alzheimer’s disease

An 18-month treatment with lecanemab slows functional and cognitive loss by 27 per cent in people with mild Alzheimer’s disease. But this is only the first step towards a real cure.
Currently, the only approved drugs for Alzheimer’s merely alleviate some of the symptoms — partially and temporarily — but do not stop the disease from progressing. (Shutterstock)

Why don’t we have a cure for Alzheimer’s disease?

It was first officially described 115 years ago, but we still do not have a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. The human brain is extremely complex, and Alzheimer’s is its most complex disease.

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