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Articles on Bisphenol A (BPA)

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Most plastic products that are clear and strong are made using bisphenol A, or BPA. Beton Studio/iStock via Getty Images

What is BPA and why is it in so many plastic products?

The US Environmental Protection Agency is reexamining the health effects of bisphenol A. A chemist explains why BPA is in plastics and why it’s hard to find a safe replacement.
The chemical BPA has been shown to leach from food packaging products into our bodies. Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Decades of research document the detrimental health effects of BPA – an expert on environmental pollution and maternal health explains what it all means

Due to increasing concerns over the health hazards posed by BPA, the Food and Drug Administration plans to reevaluate the safety of the controversial chemical for use in everyday products.
BPA is an industrial chemical used to make hard, clear plastic known as polycarbonate. It’s also used in the lining of some cans. Many hard plastic bottles no longer contain BPA, and it’s illegal to sell baby bottles with BPA in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Science shows that BPA and other endocrine disruptors are harmful to human health, which should incite tighter regulations

There is abundant evidence of the involvement of endocrine disruptors in reproductive dysfunction in several species, including humans.
Many plastics that used BPA have now replaced it with substitutes like BPS, a related molecule that may have just as many health issues. skhunda/Shutterstock.com

Study shows BPA substitutes may cause same health issues as the original

BPA, used widely in plastics and as a liner in food cans, was replaced by a related chemical called BPS. But it seems that this substitute may also harm eggs and sperm and disrupt hormones.
Microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea. By Dirk Wahn/shutterstock.com

We are guinea pigs in a worldwide experiment on microplastics

Microplastics are everywhere–our water, soil, and even the air we breathe. The consequences of this exposure on human health is unknown. But studies in animals give us reason to worry.
Harmful chemicals in shampoo and other personal products can cause real harm once they’re washed down the drain. Shutterstock

Companies should take charge of the potential toxins in common products

Regulation can’t keep up with the thousands of harmful chemicals that wash down our drains. Rather, companies should take responsibility for their products – before they hit the market.

New evidence for BPA and obesity? Not so fast!

The headline image of the University of Melbourne’s Facebook link to its press release about recent research on Bisphenol A (BPA) is of a takeaway coffee cup. The kind that does not have any BPA in it…
What’s in your water bottle?

BPS, a popular substitute for BPA in consumer products, may not be safer

Manufacturers have removed the industrial chemical BPA from many products over concerns that it mimics hormones in the body. Now studies show that BPS, a popular substitute, has similar effects.

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