Articles on Black History Month Canada

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Detail from Mickalene Thomas’s ‘Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe: Les trois femmes noires’ which is part of a show called ‘Femmes Noires’ currently at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann Collection © Mickalene Thomas

Black Canadian women artists detangle the roots of Black beauty

A recent and powerful exhibit by New York artist Mickalene Thomas at the Art Gallery of Ontario has opened the door for some deep discussions about Black Canadian women and visual representation.
Barbershop Talks creates a place for Black men and boys to meet and discuss ideas about masculinity. Edgar Chaparro/Unsplash

Barbershop Talks: A safe place to discuss Black masculinity

Barbershop Talks use the idea of the "barbershop around the corner" as a place to meet and discuss ideas and create a safe space for Black men and boys to talk openly about masculinity.
‘…Everything Remains Raw,’ a show at the McMichael gallery blends traditional art spaces with fresh ideas from hip hop culture such as this piece by Patrick Nichols, 10013 Michie Mee, 1993.

Hip hop culture paves the way forward

Hip hop is a vibrant cultural art form that Canadian public institutions need to embrace. Our aging institutions can get a new life by integrating hip hop with and into traditional art displays.
The artists who first sang the legendary Canadian hip hop song “Northern Touch” 20 years ago reunited to perform at the 2018 Juno Awards. From left to right: Checkmate, Red1, Misfit, Kardinal Offishall, Choclair and Thrust. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The Juno Awards finally celebrate hip hop, but is it too late?

The current global dominance of Canadian music on today's Billboard charts obscures the difficulties many early rap artists faced in garnering local support for this country’s hip hop music.

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