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Articles on Brain imaging

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A new brain-imaging study finds that participants who had even mild COVID-19 showed an average reduction in whole brain sizes. Kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, such as reductions in gray matter – a neuroscientist explains emerging research

New research offers insights into the brain after COVID-19 that may have implications for our understanding of long COVID-19 and how the disease affects our senses of taste and smell.
The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the potential long-term effects of COVID-19. Yuichiro Chino via Getty Images

Preliminary research finds that even mild cases of COVID-19 leave a mark on the brain – but it’s not yet clear how long it lasts

Reduced brain volume in people who have experienced COVID-19 resembles brain changes typically seen in older adults. The implications of these findings are not yet clear.
Red quantum dots glow inside a rat brain cell. Nanoscale Advances, 2019, 1, 3424 - 3442

Quantum dots that light up TVs could be used for brain research

These tiny nanoparticles might provide a new way to see what’s happening in the brain and even deliver treatments to specific cells – if researchers figure out how to use them safely and effectively.
New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman (11) and Los Angeles Chargers linebacker Uchenna Nwosu (42) collide during an NFL divisional playoff football game, Jan. 13, 2019, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Super Bowl: Why you don’t need an MRI to detect concussion

A standard clinical MRI is not sensitive to the distributed and microscopic injuries in a concussed brain. But new discoveries are in the pipeline.
A pair of identical twins. The one on the right has OCD, while the one on the left does not. Brain Imaging Research Division, Wayne State University School of Medicine

How seeing problems in the brain makes stigma disappear

It can be very hard for people to accept that they – or their family member – are not to blame for their mental illness. Seeing the evidence in a scan can make a difference.
A subject plays a computer game as part of a neural security experiment at the University of Washington. Patrick Bennett

Helping or hacking? Engineers and ethicists must work together on brain-computer interface technology

BCI devices that read minds and act on intentions can change lives for the better. But they could also be put to nefarious use in the not-too-distant future. Now’s the time to think about risks.
A study has found there are differences in the brains of people with ADHD. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Imaging study confirms differences in ADHD brains

This week, the prestigious journal The Lancet published a large study identifying objective differences in the brains of people diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
An early understanding of numbers may be a sign of mathematical ability. Oksana Kuzmina

What makes a mathematical genius?

You may have got what it takes to be a mathematical genius without even being aware of it.

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