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Articles on British Columbia

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A driver charges his electric car at a Tesla Supercharger station in Miami, Fla. In areas where multi-unit residential buildings cannot adopt EV charging infrastructure, public vehicle charging stations are crucial. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Electric vehicles are now trending. But where can we charge them?

Canada’s zero-emissions vehicle sales target will need hundreds of thousands of EV charging points to be installed in homes, workplaces, retail spaces and along highway corridors in the coming years.
Canada has a shortage of doctors. That’s why making it difficult for internationally trained doctors to practise here is so mystifying. (Francisco Venancio, Unsplash)

Why is Canada snubbing internationally trained doctors during a health-care crisis?

Canada is sidelining qualified doctors while many Canadians struggle to find health care. Here’s what we can and must do better for internationally trained physicians.
Montessori education encourages split grades, and as a school with low enrolment numbers, it already had teachers teaching multiple grades in a single class. (Shutterstock)

How one small school in B.C. became a public elementary Montessori school

Building trusting relations among teachers, parents, a community and school administrators is important when schools enter decision-making processes about programs of choice.
Following historic drought in 2021, reservoir levels dropped down in the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River, which gets its waters from the melting snowpack from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. (pxhere.com)

Scientists dig deep and find a way to accurately predict snowmelt after droughts

Unprecedented droughts leave the subsurface drier than usual, affecting water supply in subsequent years.
Neighbours from Tla’amin, K’omoks, Qualicum and Tsimshian Nations gather around the newly. erected plaque on Xwe’etay honoring the ancestral Indigenous people of the island. (Kathy Schulz)

How community-engaged archaeology can be a pathway to reconciliation

One project on a small island in B.C. is demonstrating how archaeology can bring communities together and serve as a basis for reconciliation.
Alex Bird (second from the left) and his siblings from the Lheidli T'enneh First Nation were among the first students to attend this public school, near Prince George, B.C., in the early 1910s. (Royal B.C. Museum, Image B-00342, British Columbia Archives)

Reckoning with the history of public schooling and settler colonialism

In B.C., residential school principals sat on public school boards, and some Indigenous children even attended public schools. Understanding such links matters for truth and reconciliation.
Climate researchers stress that natural gas bridges can often lead to nowhere as the reliance on natural gas can lock countries into fossil fuels, crowd out low-carbon technologies and risk stranding assets. (Shutterstock)

A bridge to nowhere: Natural gas will not lead Canada to a sustainable energy future

Fossil fuel companies are winning the battle on how we talk about natural gas expansion by referring to it as a “bridge fuel” or an essential bridge to the net-zero energy system of the future.
Housing policy-makers should pay attention not only to how much housing is available and how often rental units turn over, but to residential stability and the quality of life that homes and neighbourhoods provide. (Shutterstock)

More housing supply isn’t a cure-all for the housing crisis

Unaffordability is only one type of housing vulnerability that has taken its toll on British Columbians during the COVID-19 pandemic.
A rare find — a fossil of Stanleycaris hirpex with the nervous system preserved. (Jean Bernard Caron/Royal Ontario Museum)

Three-eyed Cambrian fossils shed new light on arthropod head evolution

The discovery of a fossil over 500 million years old reveals new information. Its brain and nervous system are remarkably preserved, filling in some gaps in what we know about arthropod evolution.
B.C. Minister of Mental Health and Addictions Sheila Malcolmson holds a copy of exemption documents that enable British Columbia to decriminalize possession of small amounts of ‘hard’ drugs for personal use. B.C.’s bold experiment will be closely watched as a comparator with other progressive jurisdictions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Decriminalizing hard drugs in B.C. follows decades of public health advocacy

British Columbia’s bold experiment provides an opportunity to implement more balance in Canadian drug policy, and a more principled withdrawal from the war on drugs.
A woman and children who were stranded by high water due to flooding are rescued by a volunteer operating a boat in Abbotsford, B.C., in November 2021. The Insurance Institute of Canada forecasts that annual insured losses from natural disasters could increase to $5 billion within the next 10 years. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Insurance isn’t enough: Governments need to do better on natural disaster resilience

Although insurance is important in natural disaster recovery, government and property owners also play an important role in protecting Canadians against the impact of catastrophic weather events.

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