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Articles on Civility

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Republican nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic nominee Sen. Tim Kaine stand after the vice-presidential debate in Farmville, Va., Oct. 4, 2016. Joe Raedle/Pool via AP

A brief history of presidents snubbing their successors – and why the founders favored civility instead

'Mind your manners' isn't just something your mother told you. Manners – and civility – are an essential component of how things get done in government, and the Founding Fathers knew it.
Republican candidate Mitt Romney (L) and Democratic candidate, U.S. President Barack Obama (R) during the 2012 presidential debate in Denver on Oct. 3, moderated by Jim Lehrer. Getty/Chip Somodevilla

Lessons on wrangling candidates from the masterful moderator of presidential debates, Jim Lehrer

Jim Lehrer moderated 12 presidential debates between 1988 and 2012. His lessons on how to run a debate should be studied by today's moderators, writes a former presidential speechwriter.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tears up her copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Civility in politics is harder than you think

It's easy to perceive a political opponent as being uncivil – and that opens the door for an uncivil reply as well.
Eroding civility is not just a U.S. phenomenon. We need to learn how to speak to each other, no matter what our politics. (Shutterstock)

Making society civil again

Eroding civility is not just an American phenomenon; it's global. But it's time for a return to civility as we reflect on how we will be judged and remembered when the dust of history settles upon us.

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