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Articles on Colonization

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As statues topple, business schools must begin seriously decolonizing. (Piqsels)

A call to decolonize business schools, including our own

Contemplating the future of the business school means we must decide what kind of society we want our students to create and what reforms are needed to enable them to do so.
Delegates from 34 Native tribes at the Creek Council House in Indian Territory, now called Oklahoma, 1880. National Archives

Oklahoma is – and always has been – Native land

The Supreme Court's July 9 ruling that half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee Nation confirms what Indigenous people already knew: North America is 'Indian Country.'
The white-moves-first rule became standard in the late 1800s. Nupat Arjkla / EyeEm / Getty Images

Why does white always go first in chess?

Ever since the late 1800s, it has been standard for white to go first in chess. Has the time come to get rid of that rule?
Aja Conrad, the Karuk Tribe’s workforce and internships coordinator, lights a prescribed fire in Orleans, California. Jenny Staats

What western states can learn from Native American wildfire management strategies

Instead of suppressing wildfire, the Karuk Tribe in the Pacific Northwest is using it as an integral part of its climate change management plan. Federal, state and local agencies are taking note.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.
Tuberculosis has been a problem for decades among Canada’s northern Indigenous population. New data obtained through access to information requests reveals shockingly high TB rates among Nunavut’s infants. Poor data collection indicates the real rates will be even higher. (Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada)

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB

The TB epidemic is out of control in Canada's North. Eliminating the disease will require accurate data as well as government investment.

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