Menu Close

Articles on Colour

Displaying 1 - 20 of 38 articles

The Orange Problem, 2019, Acrylic on panel, 72 x 72 cm. © Robert Pepperell 2019. The author

Art, science and the paradoxes of perception

When we look at art we may not all see the same thing. It all depends on what happens in our brains.
Claude Monet, France, 1840-1926, La pie (The magpie), 1868-1869, oil on canvas, 121.4 x 164.1 cm. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France, ©photo Musée d'Orsay / rmn

In The Magpie, Monet found all the colour in a snowy day

Claude Monet painted The Magpie in winter 1868, turning his interest in colour on the blank canvass of snow.
Everyone sees them all, but we don’t all give them the same distinct names. lazyllama/Shutterstock.com

Languages don’t all have the same number of terms for colors – scientists have a new theory why

People across the globe all see millions of distinct colors. But the terms we use to describe them vary across cultures. New cognitive science research suggests it's about what we want to communicate.
In India, a light complexion is associated with power, status and beauty, fueling an innovative and growing market of skin-bleaching products. Adam Jones/Flickr

Bleached girls: India and its love for light skin

Indian girls grow up in an environment where they are constantly reminded that fair is beautiful.
Butterfly wings, like those of the monarch butterfly, have inspired scientists to create “structural colours”. tea maeklong/Shutterstock

Explainer: how scientists invent new colours

Scientists continue to invent new colours for new applications thanks to nanoscale structures.

Top contributors

More