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Articles on Common cold

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Viruses spread easier during the winter than other times of the year, but being outside isn’t the main cause of transmission. Christopher Kimmel via Getty Images

Will going out in the cold give you a cold?

Going out in the cold won't necessarily lead to you getting a cold. But cold weather in general is more hospitable to viruses, so it's wise to take steps to keep your immune system strong.
Antibiotics do not shorten or reduce the severity of colds or flu, but they could produce adverse effects that make you feel even worse. (Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio)

Antibiotics in cold and flu season: Potentially harmful and seldom helpful

Resistant bacteria aren't the only risk posed by overprescribing antibiotics. A more immediate risk is side-effects and reactions, which a new review shows are surprisingly frequent and often severe.
Brazilian scientist working on a vaccine at the Immunology laboratory of the Heart Institute (Incor) of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA

Coronavirus vaccine: reasons to be optimistic

We don't have vaccines for the Sars, Mers or the common cold. But that doesn't mean scientists won't crack it this time.
One nostril or two? Hard blow or gentle? Some ways are more effective and less risky than others. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: what’s the right way to blow your nose?

If you have a blocked or runny nose, chances are you'll reach for a tissue or hanky for a good blow. But is your technique up to scratch?
More people end up in hospital from cold than flu. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Health Check: what is the common cold and how do we get it?

The “common cold” is common, most of us will have at least one or two per year. Despite this, there's a lack of good research looking into it, and ways to prevent and treat it.
People who have big weekends tend to take more sickies at work. from shutterstock.com

Could a weekend of binge-drinking worsen your cold?

There's no doubt chronic alcohol abuse changes the body's infection-defence system. But here's what the research says on whether a binge-drinking weekend can make people more susceptible to illness.
The more we take antibiotics, the more likely we are to have superbugs down the line. Brandice Schnabel/Flickr

When should you take antibiotics?

Antibiotics can prevent serious harm and stop infections becoming fatal. But they won't kill common cold and flu viruses, and careless overprescribing by doctors can do more harm than good.
People aren’t productive at work when they’re ill and they risk infecting others. William Brawley/Flickr

Health Check: I feel a bit sick, should I stay home or go to work?

You wake up and feel under the weather. If you're vomiting or have a fever, the decision to stay at home is probably clear cut. But what if you generally feel unwell but are torn about missing work?

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