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Articles on Common cold

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Viral surveillance and prediction may be key parts of figuring out what goes into a vaccine. Pexels Cover/500px via Getty Images

Future COVID-19 booster shots will likely need fresh formulations as new coronavirus variants of concern continue to emerge

A new generation of vaccines and boosters against SARS-CoV-2 may take a page from the anti-influenza playbook, with shots periodically tailored to target the most commonly circulating virus strains.
Viruses spread easier during the winter than other times of the year, but being outside isn’t the main cause of transmission. Christopher Kimmel via Getty Images

Will going out in the cold give you a cold?

Going out in the cold won’t necessarily lead to you getting a cold. But cold weather in general is more hospitable to viruses, so it’s wise to take steps to keep your immune system strong.
Antibiotics do not shorten or reduce the severity of colds or flu, but they could produce adverse effects that make you feel even worse. (Pexels/Andrea Piacquadio)

Antibiotics in cold and flu season: Potentially harmful and seldom helpful

Resistant bacteria aren’t the only risk posed by overprescribing antibiotics. A more immediate risk is side-effects and reactions, which a new review shows are surprisingly frequent and often severe.
Brazilian scientist working on a vaccine at the Immunology laboratory of the Heart Institute (Incor) of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA

Coronavirus vaccine: reasons to be optimistic

We don’t have vaccines for the Sars, Mers or the common cold. But that doesn’t mean scientists won’t crack it this time.

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