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Articles on Community

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Improving death-friendliness offers further opportunity to improve social inclusion. A death-friendly approach could lay the groundwork for people to stop fearing getting old or alienating those who have. (Shutterstock)

Death-friendly communities ease fear of aging and dying

Death-friendly communities that welcome mortality might help us live better lives and provide better care for people at the end of their lives.
Some of the highest coronavirus hospitalization rates in Denver are in neighborhoods near Valverde, a community that was once redlined. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images

Is your neighborhood raising your coronavirus risk? Redlining decades ago set communities up for greater danger

Neighborhood characteristics like pollution from busy roads, widespread public transit use and lack of community-based health care are putting certain communities at greater risk from COVID-19.
Maryam Sadat Montajabi, centre left, and her daughter Romina Khaksar, 15, who both moved to Canada from Iran in 2015, wait to have their photo taken with dignitaries after becoming Canadian citizens during a special Canada Day citizenship ceremony, in West Vancouver on July 1, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Immigrants are worrying about social ties and finances during coronavirus

Immigrants and other newcomers to Canada are worried about maintaining their relationships and staying afloat, and need government consideration and support.
During coronavirus lockdowns, gardens have served as an escape from feelings of alienation. Richard Bord/Getty Images

The impulse to garden in hard times has deep roots

What drives people to garden isn't the fear of hunger so much as hunger for physical contact – and a longing to engage in work that is real.

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