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Articles on Community health workers

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A woman with her baby collects her household goods in front of her newly built shack in Khayelitsha, outside Cape Town. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images

Community health workers can help South African women with perinatal depression

Pregnant women and mothers of infants are at a higher risk of experiencing depression because of increased pressures they face economically, in their relationships, with their families, and socially.
The stigma on men’s involvement in maternal health is a significant barrier to their participation. GettyImages

How men can support maternal health: lessons from Rwanda

Men can practically help their partners access care by assisting with the costs of attending clinical appointments such as transportation, health insurance, and meals while on route to the clinic.
“We saw patients dying for avoidable reasons. They were dying because masks that came loose were not being replaced,” says MSF COVID-19 intervention nursing activities manager, Caroline Masunda. Chris Allan

Small things can save lives: coping with COVID-19 in resource-scarce hospitals

Where there are not enough health workers to deliver medical care, one solution is to move certain tasks to less specialised health workers, a process called task-shifting.
Child mortality rates in the country are high. John Fredricks/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How smartphones could help improve child health in Malawi

Health surveillance assistants provide services in village clinics, mainly by assessing signs and symptoms in sick children. An electronic community case management app could make their job easier.
Farmworkers are essential workers who must decide every morning whether they will leave their home to work the fields to provide for their families and the nation. John Moore/Getty Images News via Getty Images

Rethinking what research means during a global pandemic

In the wake of COVID-19, researchers can become trusted figures of authority who can re-appropriate their networks, skills and knowledge to better the lives of vulnerable populations.
Health workers go door-to-door to screen for COVID-19 in Pretoria, South Africa. Alet Pretorius/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Community based workers can help disabled people access services during COVID-19

South Africa’s disaster management plan targets the most vulnerable. But it needs to respond in a more deliberate way when it comes to people with disabilities.
Women in Nepal are tapped for volunteer health work. Many take on the work out of a sense of duty, but also gain access to otherwise inaccessible opportunities. Here women are seen on a bus in Pokhara, Nepal. Terry Boynton/Unsplash

Women health-care volunteers have no upward mobility

Women health-care volunteers in places like Nepal, Afghanistan and Ethiopia play a vital role in the health system, yet they are undervalued and undertrained.
A woman extension worker employed by the Afar Pastoralist Development Association. Some health extension workers are separated from their families and some are unable to move. Kate Holt/Anglican Overseas Aid

Ethiopia has cracked the problem of rural health, but its workers feel stuck

In Ethiopia health extension workers in rural areas fulfill an essential service - but they feel they have no career path.

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