Articles on Congress

Displaying 1 - 20 of 85 articles

Trump before delivering the State of the Union address with Pelosi and Pence. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Pool via REUTERS

Immigration, legislation, investigation and child poverty: 4 scholars respond to Trump’s State of the Union

Four scholars weigh in on President Donald Trump's State of the Union speech, exploring his statements on immigration, childhood poverty, the border wall and the investigations into his campaign.
Letter from President Trump to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. AP/Wayne Partlow

Separation of powers: An invitation to struggle

After the recent government shutdown and breakdowns in functioning within all three branches, it looks like the separation of powers system is broken or unbalanced. It is – and it isn't.
Ilhan Omar, a newly elected Democratic congresswoman from Minnesota, joins other Democrats during a news conference in Washington on Jan. 4 about the introduction of the ‘For the People’ Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The urgent need for Democrats to embrace progressive policies

The Democratic party needs a revised image, grounded in a new reality, that will address basic issues of inequality, access and fairness.
GOP President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O'Neill at the April, 1983 signing of bipartisan social security legislation. AP/Barry Thumma

Congress used to pass bipartisan legislation – will it ever again?

Most Congresses since the 1970s have passed more than 500 laws, ranging from nuclear disarmament to deficit reduction. Will today's bitter partisanship hamstring the new Congress' productivity?
Supreme Court justices stood with Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump on the day of Kavanaugh’s investiture. AP/Supreme Court provided

Kavanaugh’s impact on the Supreme Court and the country may not be as profound as predicted

With Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court, many predict that the court will move to the right on issues from abortion to gun rights. But Supreme Court rulings are often not the last word on a matter.
California’s Katie Porter, seen here with Democratic candidates and former president Barack Obama, is one of just three first-time female congressional candidates in California. AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

Female candidates running in record numbers for the midterms — just not in California

A record number of women are poised to win public office in 2018. But don't look to California for help shifting the gender balance in Congress during the 'year of the woman.'
Judge Brett Kavanaugh appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Saul Loeb/Pool Image via AP

Interruptions at Supreme Court confirmation hearings have been rising since the 1980s

One striking feature of Brett Kavanaugh's testimony was the number of times he interrupted. Data shows that hearing interruptions are becoming more common, particularly when the nominee is female.

Top contributors

More