Articles on Coronavirus 2020

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Sunlight, ventilation and relative humidity all affect the microbiome of indoor spaces. iStock / Getty Images Plus

Buildings have their own microbiomes – we’re striving to make them healthy places

We spend 90% of our lives indoors, and every building has its own indoor microbiome. Can we learn to manage them in ways that support helpful microbes and suppress harmful ones?
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson thanks National Health Service workers for saving his life. Twitter Boris Johnson/Downing Street via AP

Why Boris Johnson won’t have to pay any hospital bills

In the UK, nobody collects patients' insurance information or credit card details. There's simply no charge for services, including doctor visits, ambulances and hospitalizations.
Developed nations like Spain struggled to provide enough hospital beds for coronavirus patients, so what are poorer nations to do? Ballesteros/EPA/AAP

Hospital beds and coronavirus test centres are needed fast. Here’s an Australian-designed solution

COVID-19 is creating overwhelming needs for intensive care and testing facilities. An Australian team is developing purpose-built units that can be shipped and erected quickly, easily and cheaply.
At a deserted Federation Square in Melbourne, the big screen broadcasts this message: ‘If you can see this, what are you doing? Go home.’ Cassie Zervos/Twitter

We don’t know what we’ve got till it’s gone – we must reclaim public space lost to the coronavirus crisis

Current restrictions remind us of the value of access to public space and one another. Yet even before COVID-19 some people were excluded and targeted, so a return to the status quo isn't good enough.
Young Minnesota voters cast their ballots on March 3, before the coronavirus outbreak really set in for the U.S. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

How to reach young voters when they’re stuck at home

Young voters are important to the continuity of democracy because voting at a young age leads to continued voting throughout life. This year more than most, they'll have a hard time getting started.
Development of vaccines typically takes several months and can be slowed by manufacturing requirements. PHILIPPE DESMAZES/AFP via Getty Images

Researchers seek to repurpose an existing manufacturing platform to produce a COVID-19 vaccine

In the search for a rapid COVID-19 vaccine, researchers are modifying a method using the chemical riboflavin now used to prevent disease transmission during blood transfusions.
Health care workers at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Missouri, wear face shields donated by students from Camdenton High School in Camdenton, Missouri. Provided courtesy of Camdenton High School

Students fight pandemic – and get real-world experience – by using 3D printers to make face shields

The COVID-19 outbreak presents many opportunities for students to develop needed solutions to real-life problems, says a researcher overseeing school project to produce personal protective equipment.
Nangala, an Alyawarr woman from Tennant Creek, with her granddaughter, beside her temporary housing. Photo by Trisha Narurla Frank, provided with permission

Fix housing and you’ll reduce risks of coronavirus and other disease in remote Indigenous communities

Reducing crowding and repairing social housing can decrease the risk of COVID-19 in remote Indigenous communities. It will bring other long-term benefits, too.
Milwaukee voters wait in a social-distancing line, some wearing masks, before voting in the state’s spring elections on April 7. AP Photo/Morry Gash

Why the Supreme Court made Wisconsin vote during the coronavirus crisis

The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has reversed its decadeslong practice of protecting voters' rights and removing barriers to casting ballots.
Air raid wardens in Washington, D.C., conduct a practice air raid. Office for Emergency Management, Office of War Information/National Archives

Cold War-style preparedness could help fight future pandemics

Since the Cold War, Americans have shifted from engaging in active self-rescue to passively waiting for help from a centralized, bureaucratic federal emergency response.

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