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Articles on CRISPR/Cas9

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Mikaela Nordborg/Australian Institute of Marine Science

Gene editing is revealing how corals respond to warming waters. It could transform how we manage our reefs

New research involving CRISPR technology has furthered our understanding of corals’ gene functions. Specifically, it has revealed a mechanism underpinning how corals withstand heat stress.
American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, left, and French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier were awarded this year’s Nobel Prize for chemistry. Alexander Heinl/picture alliance via Getty Images

Nobel Prize for chemistry honors exquisitely precise gene-editing technique, CRISPR – a gene engineer explains how it works

The tools to rewrite the genetic code to improve crops and livestock, or to treat genetic diseases, has revolutionized biology. A CRISPR engineer explains why this technology won the Nobel, and its potential.
What if you could test yourself for coronavirus with a test in the comfort of your home? John Paraskevas/Newsday RM vis Getty Images

Rapid home-based coronavirus tests are coming together in research labs — we’re working on analyzing spit using advanced CRISPR gene editing techniques

Testing for coronavirus has been a fiasco in the US. But now companies are developing super fast tests, including ones that might eventually be as simple as at home pregnancy tests.
The team used CRISPR on human embryos in a bid to render them resistant to HIV infection. But instead, they generated different mutations, about which we know nothing. SHUTTERSTOCK

China’s failed gene-edited baby experiment proves we’re not ready for human embryo modification

A number of things may have gone wrong when researchers edited Chinese twins Lulu and Nana’s genome. Either way, the failed experiment is a cautionary tale for us all.
Scientists are using gene editing to make better cancer treatments. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

How gene-edited white blood cells are helping fight cancer

In a new study, a team of US scientists have used gene editing to change the genetic code of white blood cells and transform them into more efficient tumor fighting cells. How did they do it?
Experts have called for a moratorium on clinical research with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. of the germline — that is changing heritable DNA in sperm, eggs or embryos to make genetically modified children. (Shutterstock)

CRISPR gene editing: Why we need Slow Science

CRISPR gene editing should learn from the Slow Food movement. Scientists must allow time for critical conversations and perfecting of techniques before rewriting the source code of humanity.
CRISPR is a gene editing tool that can create permanent changes in the human genome. from www.shutterstock.com

Experts call for halt to CRISPR editing that allows gene changes to pass on to children

Four months ago a researcher claimed he had used the tool CRISPR to edit the genomes of twin girls. Now prominent researchers and ethicists are calling for a temporary halt to this sort of work.
In a masterfully manipulative Youtube video, He Jiankui tells the world about the first genetically edited babies. AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

YouTube, persuasion and genetically engineered children

To announce the world’s first gene-edited babies, scientist He Jiankui did what movie directors do: release a trailer on YouTube. The video is a positive spin on unauthorized gene editing.

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