Menu Close

Articles on Data collection

Displaying 1 - 20 of 71 articles

A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
Rural health providers have had to adapt to the pandemic by providing services in locations like school gyms and community centers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Rural health cooperatives are challenged by connectivity and social distancing – but are innovating

The pandemic has exacerbated existing issues of connectivity and access, but providers and patients are finding creative solutions.
Public data is vital to the functioning of a democracy. Witthaya Prasongsin / Getty Images

Video: Who controls pandemic data?

A White House decision to take over collection of COVID-19 data from the CDC sparked worries over political interference. A public data expert talks about the importance of transparent public data.
Artificial systems use reams of data to get a better profiles of individuals.

AI could help solve the privacy problems it has created

Artificial intelligence insatiable data needs has encouraged the mass collection of personal data, placing privacy at risk. But AI can help solve the very problem it creates.
Drones are increasingly used to gather information and inform research. As technology develops longer-lasting batteries and more sensitive cameras, the role of drones in research will continue to grow. (Shutterstock)

Drones help track wildfires, count wildlife and map plants

Drones have proven extremely useful for research, collecting detailed data to help monitor hard-to-access areas.

Top contributors

More