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Articles on Digital surveillance

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State surveillance has a big impact on the way RCMP treat Indigenous land defenders. Listen to our podcast for more info. Here, RCMP officers walk toward an anti-logging blockade in Caycuse, B.C., in May. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne

Intense police surveillance for Indigenous land defenders contrasts with a laissez-faire stance for anti-vax protesters

In recent years, Indigenous land defenders have lived under increasing police and state surveillance while far-right, conspiratorial movements have not.
A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
New legislation allows Australian government agencies to access encrypted WhatsApp messages. from www.shutterstock.com

Australians accept government surveillance, for now

The government can access your phone metadata, drivers licence photo and much more. And new research shows Australians are OK about it. But that might change.
Who’s collecting your data, and what are they using your data for? Brian A. Jackson/Shutterstock.com

The real costs of cheap surveillance

What governments and companies think they know about us – whether or not it’s accurate – has real power over our actual lives.
Do you know who has the rights to access your digital data? And who might be interested in acquiring that information? West Point-US Military Academy/Flickr

Act now to protect your digital rights, Big Brother and his Little Sisters may be watching

Sooner or later, China will recognise the value of digital assets. This adds to the urgency of citizens ensuring they control the data trails that tell the world what they think and do.
What if even you didn’t know your own password? Password via shutterstock.com

Why we should not know our own passwords

As searches of smartphones and other digital devices at US borders become more common, can research and computer science help protect travelers’ privacy?

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