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Articles on Direct air capture

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This direct air capture plant in Iceland was designed to capture 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Climeworks 2021 via AP Photos

How not to solve the climate change problem

A climate scientist looks at what works and some popular ideas that aren’t as cheap or effective as people hope.
Building solar panels over water sources is one way to both provide power and reduce evaporation in drought-troubled regions. Robin Raj, Citizen Group & Solar Aquagrid

These energy innovations could transform how we mitigate climate change, and save money in the process – 5 essential reads

From pulling carbon dioxide out of the air to turning water into fuel, innovators are developing new technologies and pairing existing ones to help slow global warming.
The U.S. had seven operating offshore wind turbines with 42 megawatts of capacity in 2021. The Biden administration’s goal is 30,000 megawatts by 2030. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

Offshore wind farms could help capture carbon from air and store it long-term – using energy that would otherwise go to waste

Wind turbines often can produce more power than is needed for electricity onshore. That extra energy could be put to work capturing and storing carbon.
One ‘mechanical tree’ is about 1,000 times faster at removing carbon dioxide from air than a natural tree. The first is to start operating in Arizona in 2022. Illustration via Arizona State University

These machines scrub greenhouse gases from the air – an inventor of direct air capture technology shows how it works

Klaus Lackner is finding new ways to cut the technology’s high costs and energy demand, and he’s about to launch the first ‘mechanical tree’.
Most carbon dioxide captured in the U.S. today is used to extract more oil. Citizens of the Planet/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why the oil industry’s pivot to carbon capture and storage – while it keeps on drilling – isn’t a climate change solution

Most carbon dioxide captured in the U.S. today is used to extract more oil. Two scholars point to another way: biological sequestration.
Without rapid and dramatic changes, the world will face a higher risk of extreme weather and other effects of climate change. AP Photo/Mike Groll

Why we can’t reverse climate change with ‘negative emissions’ technologies

The UN’s panel on climate change said that technologies to remove CO2 will be necessary to limit global temperature rise to only 1.5 degrees Celsius. But these techniques are largely unproven.

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