Articles on Disaster

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The United Nations (UN) has called for the empowerment of persons with disabilities so they are not only involved but also can lead in disaster management. Their leadership is vital to ensure that every disaster response also meets the need of persons with disabilities. www.shutterstock.com

3 ways to encourage people with disabilities to be involved in leading disaster responses

Encouraging people with disabilities to lead in the emergency response is vital if we want to prevent more people becoming disabled, or dying, as a result of disaster.
A firefighter walks along a containment line while battling a 2018 wildfire in Redding, California. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Data science could help Californians battle future wildfires

Researchers like myself are finding transformative new ways to help planners, leaders and first responders tackle disasters from afar.
Red Cross forensic specialist Stephen Fonseca, right, searches for bodies in a field of ruined maize in Magaru, Mozambique, after Cyclone Idai, April 4, 2019. AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

Humanitarian forensic scientists trace the missing, identify the dead and comfort the living

Meet the unsung aid workers who put their lives on the line during war and natural disaster to make sure the dead are treated with respect – and that their grieving families get closure.
The aftermath of the Brumadinho dam collapse, which took place on January 25, 2019, in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Vinícius Mendonça/Ibama

Eyes in the sky: How satellites can monitor infrastructure health

Population growth is creating a huge demand for infrastructure, even as environmental risks grow. To detect problems early, satellites can provide rich data to help assess infrastructure "health".
Chaplain of the Paris Fire Department, Jean-Marc Fournier. AP Photo/Thibault Camus

From Paris to Boston, the crucial role of fire chaplains

A chaplain of the Paris Fire Brigade helped save several items during the fire at Notre Dame Cathedral. Rarely seen, fire chaplains often take enormous risks to provide support during disasters.
Mount Merapi in Central Java, one of the most active of more than 100 Indonesian volcanoes, is among the most dangerous volcanoes on earth. Boy Triharjanto/EPA

Living with natural disasters – how to change Indonesia’s culture of passive resignation

Whether in direct response to these events or as a way of coping with their consequences, many Indonesians react to the unpredictability of the natural world with a “wait and see” attitude.
U.S. President Donald Trump is seen visiting the California town of Paradise that was devastated by forest fires. Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to pay for his border wall. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Disasters and disagreements: Climate change collides with Trump’s border wall

Donald Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to fund his border wall. It's time to rethink how we frame disasters to stop politicians from using them for political gain.
People takes selfies with their mobile phones near the ruins of earthquakes in Palu Central Sulawesi last October. Hotli Simanjuntak/EPA

Why we shouldn’t take selfies at disaster-affected areas

Taking selfie at disaster sites is so wrong at many levels. Not only it poses risks but the action also indicates mental issues
A destroyed house in an earthquake-devastated area at Balaroa village in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, October 11 2018. It’s reported at least 2,045 people have died as a result of earthquakes that hit central Sulawesi and triggered a tsunami. EPA/Hotli Simanjuntak

After the Palu and Lombok disasters: a new chapter of disaster governance in Indonesia?

The last two major disasters show that Indonesia needs to embrace a new chapter in its disaster risk governance.
A man tries to get his dog out of a flooded neighbourhood in Lumberton, N.C., in September 2018 in the aftermath of hurricane Florence. Many people opted to ignore evacuation warnings, suggesting a distrust of authorities. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Developing trust after disasters – and every day

A peaceful society requires us to trust our public institutions, but in order to do so, we must question them. Questions are a healthy and necessary response to a world filled with uncertainty.
Loading new furniture donated to Hurricane Irma survivors in Chokoloskee, Fla. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Sending help where it’s needed most after disasters

The billions of dollars worth of aid dispatched every year to alleviate the suffering and damage after earthquakes and hurricanes would do more good if it didn't get clumped up.
Hurricane Florence, as seen over the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 9. NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center/Handout via REUTERS

How meteorologists predict the next big hurricane

How do experts know when and where the next big hurricane is going to hit? A look at the complicated science of forecasting.

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