Articles on Disease outbreak

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A 6-month-old who is infected with measles in Madagascar, March 2019. AP Photo/Laetitia Bezain

Road to measles elimination is predictable, but can be rocky

Scientists identified the general pattern of measles infections as a country moves toward eliminating the disease. This roadmap can help public health workers most efficiently fight and end measles.
During high-stress deadly epidemics, even well-trained responders can get caught up in behaviors that are more harmful than helpful. AP Photo/Olivier Matthys

When Ebola and other epidemics strike, a dysfunctional ‘outbreak culture’ hinders adequate response

The high stress conditions of an outbreak can spread a dysfunctional culture among those working to fight it. A survey after the 2015 Ebola epidemic quantified the issue – and suggests a better way.
A baby cries during diphtheria immunisation at a clinic in Cibinong, Bogor, West Java, south of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 5, 2017. Antara Foto/Yulius Satria Wijaya/via REUTERS

Indonesia’s diphtheria outbreak: problems in vaccination and antibiotics efficacy

An outbreak of diphtheria in Indonesia is not caused by a singular factor. The country needs better vaccination coverage and distribution as well as better antibiotics.
Pregnant women in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia were faced with the double fear of dying from Ebola as well during childbirth. UNMEER/Flickr

Zika and Ebola had a much worse effect on women: we need more research to address this in future

We found that less than 1% of published research papers around the time of both outbreaks, that related to the outbreaks, actually explored their gendered impact.
A book about Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is seen next to larvae in a laboratory conducting research on preventing the spread of the Zika virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, at the Ministry of Public Health in Guatemala City. Josue Decavele/Reuters

Zika: Aedes aegypti mosquitoes love biting humans, and that’s why they spread viruses so well

Aedes aegypti is adapted to live in close proximity with humans, and this close association likely contributes to the severity of the Zika outbreak.

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