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Articles on Don't Call Me Resilient

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Supporters of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline set up a support station at kilometre 39, just outside of Gidimt'en checkpoint near Houston B.C., on January 8, 2020. The Wet'suwet'en peoples are occupying their land and trying to prevent a pipeline from going through it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Indigenous land defenders: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 6 transcript

Indigenous land defenders: Don't Call Me Resilient EP 6 transcript.
The health and well-being of temporary foreign workers in the seafood industry in Atlantic Canada are disregarded in favour of business and economic concerns. (Paul Einerhand/Unsplash)

Profits trump COVID-19 protections for migrant seafood workers in Atlantic Canada

Debates about public safety and temporary foreign workers continue without input from those whose health is most affected. Migrant workers themselves are largely invisible amid discussions about risk.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don't Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

When COVID-19 first appeared, some called it the great equalizer. But the facts quickly revealed a grim reality: COVID-19 disproportionately impacts racialized communities.
This mural in-progress outside the Apple store in Montréal is a sign of antiracist allyship: will this work help society start to address the long-term health impacts of racism? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

5 ways to address internalized white supremacy and its impact on health

While many institutions pledged their support for anti-racism work this summer, a health researcher says these ideas need to go further to address the long-term health impacts of internalized racism.
Temporary migrant workers in Canada are facing COVID-19 while dealing with an immigration system that leaves them vulnerable. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

COVID-19’s impact on migrant workers adds urgency to calls for permanent status

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought further suffering to migrant workers in Canada already experiencing the abuses of discriminatory immigration policies and poor working conditions.
A woman takes part in a protest in Montreal, Jan. 30, 2021, to demand status for all workers and to demand dignity for all non status migrants as full human beings as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don't Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript
Ministries of education need to embed ongoing anti-racist training into their teacher education programs. Short-term anti-bias training has little impact. Here, a school school in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Short-term anti-racist training is not enough to counter systemic racism in Canadian education

COVID-19 has exposed how systemic racism affects the lives of many racialized students in Canada. But what are some possible solutions?
Ending racism in schools requires a deep understanding of anti-Black racism. (Wayne Lee Sing/Unsplash)

How to curb anti-Black racism in Canadian schools

Although school boards have yet to find a systemic way to combat anti-Black racism, educators are in a unique position to correct these injustices.
A man meditates on the road by a police line as demonstrators protest on the section of 16th Street renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza, June 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

How to deal with the pain of racism — and become a better advocate: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 2 transcript

This is the full transcript for Don't Call Me Resilient, EP 2: How to deal with the pain of racism — and become a better advocate.
People take part in a mass meditation on the lawn of Parliament Hill in Ottawa in 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How to be a mindful anti-racist

Mindfulness practices may help one examine long-held cultural assumptions, allowing one to better respond to current critical issues such as climate change and systemic racism.
Students of School Section #13 with teacher, Verlyn Ladd, who taught at the school from 1939 to 1958. Class of 1951, Buxton, Raleigh Township, Ontario. (Buxton National Historic Site & Museum)

Black History: How racism in Ontario schools today is connected to a history of segregation

An 1850 act permitted the creation of separate schools for Protestants, Catholics and for any five Black families. Some white people used the act to force Black students into separate institutions.

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