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Articles on Educational technology

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Research from Alberta points to the burden parents have faced with home learning. Here, a youth passes Bloor Collegiate Institute in Toronto, May 27, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

End of topsy-turvy school year: 5 education issues exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic

The pandemic education shock has raised five critical issues that demonstrate how student learning and achievement and social well-being are far from mutually exclusive.
Schools are facing accelerated COVID-19 pressures to integrate technology into children’s education, and how they do has far-reaching implications. (Shutterstock)

Machines can’t ‘personalize’ education, only people can

Insights of neuroscientist Ian McGilchrist, philosopher Nel Noddings and physicist Ursula Franklin help centre students and our collective future in debates about education and technology.
A Grade 6 student takes part in a virtual school session with her teacher and classmates via Zoom from her home in Vancouver, April 2, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

Children’s privacy is at risk with rapid shifts to online schooling under coronavirus

Children in our schools are the latest at risk in a brave new age of surveillance and data control that is being catalyzed by hasty educational technology decisions under COVID-19.
Universities and colleges cancelling in-person classes will need more than technology to have the capacity to offer flexible education. (Shutterstock)

Coronavirus pushes universities to switch to online classes — but are they ready?

Online learning can help universities quickly adapt to COVID-19, but policy makers must pay careful attention to student experiences and take a critical view of technology companies’ claims.
Technologies like Virtual Reality can play a role in schools, but teachers must be properly empowered and involved. Rushay/Shutterstock/For editorial use only

School tech: teachers explain what they need to make it work better

A clearer understanding of teachers’ needs is required if schools and universities are to be better prepared for a future where technology is key to teaching and learning.
If Ontario rolls out mandatory high school e-learning with no in-person class hours, each student will lose 440 hours of face-to-face class time. (Shutterstock)

In Doug Ford’s e-learning gamble, high school students will lose

For high school students, e-learning is best introduced in face-to-face classes where teachers can meet a greater range of learning needs – not as a completely online experience.
Teachers can record and photograph student behaviour and display student standings to the entire class. (Shutterstock)

ClassDojo raises concerns about children’s rights

ClassDojo, the popular classroom behaviour management and communication system, is said to facilitate community and message-sharing. But who is asking how children are impacted?

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