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Articles on Elderly

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Behaviour changes like apathy, lack of impulse control or socially inappropriate behaviour may indicate a risk of dementia in people over age 50. (Shutterstock)

Early indicators of dementia: 5 behaviour changes to look for after age 50

Dementia does not manifest solely as a memory problem. People with dementia can also experience issues with learning, comprehension and judgement, but they may also experience changes in behaviour.
Even for an experienced health-care professional, estimating the life expectancy of a patient with a serious illness is challenging. (Shutterstock)

How long will a loved one live? It’s difficult to hear, but harder not to know

An accurate prediction of survival can enable earlier conversations about preferences and wishes at the end of life, and earlier introduction of palliative care.
Many of the people caught in the wildfire that swept through Paradise, Calif., in 2018 were older adults. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Wildfire risk is soaring for low-income, elderly and other vulnerable populations in California, Washington and Oregon

Alarmingly, about half the people exposed to wildfires in Washington and Oregon were those least able to afford to protect their homes, evacuate safely and recover.
A recent study has found that Canadians are highly motivated to save money in preparation of long-term care. (Shutterstock)

Older Canadians’ savings are shaped by their long-term care preferences

While both nursing homes and home care impose financial burdens, their differing structures can influence how older Canadians save money.
Centenarian Clementina Ripplinger with researcher Heather Nelson. Researchers spoke to very elderly people about what brings them joy and how they plan for the future. (Shane Luhning)

Finding joy at age 100: Talking to centenarians about living their best life at any age

What is life like at 100? Centenarians shared their joys and future hopes with a team of Saskatchewan researchers.
Programs that bring young and old together help foster meaningful relationships across generational divides. (Shutterstock)

Intergenerational Day: How bringing different generations together can support our mental well-being

Intergenerational Day serves as a reminder of what the old and young can learn from one another, as well as the benefits that come from connecting with others.
COVID-19 is still with us, and is still causing serious illness and death. However, it is disproportionately affecting older people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Ageism and the pandemic: How Canada continues to let older adults suffer and die from COVID-19

COVID-19 is the third-leading cause of death in Canada, but it’s older people who are dying. That we accept this and carry on as if the pandemic is over reveals our ageism: We don’t value older people.
Stereotypes about the elderly having more than their fair share can be heightened during times of crisis when resources are seen to be scarce. (Shutterstock)

The pandemic played into ageist stereotypes, but intergenerational contact and co-operation can overcome them

To reduce ageist perceptions of older people, we should encourage collectivist norms and the importance of acting for the common good.
People don’t necessarily tell the same stories over and over again because they’re losing cognitive function, but because the stories are important, and they feel we need to know them. (Shutterstock)

Storytelling allows elders to transfer values and meaning to younger generations

Repeated storytelling from elderly relatives doesn’t necessarily always signal age or cognitive decline. It’s about conveying memories and values to a new generation.

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