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Articles on Emergency services

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Firefighters in Kangaroo Island, South Australia. First responders’ experiences on the front line make them susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health problems. David Mariuz/AAP

To improve firefighters’ mental health, we can’t wait for them to reach out – we need to ‘reach in’

Emergency service workers already have poorer mental health than the rest of us. In the wake of this bushfire crisis, we need to make the well-being of our first responders a top priority.
A firefighting helicopter tackles a bushfire near Bairnsdale in Victoria’s East Gippsland region, Australia. State Government of Victoria

How to monitor the bushfires raging across Australia

Here’s how Australians and their overseas family and friends can monitor the movement of fire fronts in real time.
Few medical schools offer training in addictions medicine and most doctors feel they lack the specialist expertise to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

How the opioid crisis is disrupting hospital care

Canadian hospitals are ill-equipped to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. Lack of specialist addictions care puts patients and staff at risk.
Only one-third of ambulance call-outs are to incidents classified as emergencies. AAP

When is it OK to call an ambulance?

If you’re unsure whether you need an ambulance, it’s OK to call 000 for advice.
Paramedics have higher rates of mental health problems than other emergency services workers. from www.shutterstock.com

Paramedics need more support to deal with daily trauma

Paramedics face traumatic situations every day. They need policies to ensure support is provided in the immediate aftermath of trauma, and early access to mental health care.
Armed police on patrol outside Manchester Arena after it was attacked by a suicide bomber in May 2017. Peter Byrne/PA Archive/PA Images

Terror attacks: how psychological research can help improve the emergency response

Terrorist attacks are increasingly unpredictable. Manchester provides a key lesson in identifying how the gap between hypothetical plans and the reality of incidents is widening.

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