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Articles on Extreme rainfall

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A tropical storm’s rain overwhelmed a dam in Thailand and caused widespread flooding in late September. It was just one of 2021’s disasters. Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Ocean heat is at record levels, with major consequences

While surface temperatures were about the 6th warmest on record in 2021, the upper oceans were at their hottest – and they’re a stronger indicator of global warming. A top climate scientist explains.
Wildfires that swept through Sequoia National Forest in California in September 2021 were so severe they killed ancient trees that had adapted to survive fires. AP Photo/Noah Berger

Devastating Colorado fires cap a year of climate disasters in 2021, with one side of the country too wet, the other dangerously dry

US disasters in 2021 told a tale of two climate extremes. A climate scientist explains why wet areas are getting wetter and dry areas drier.
The effects of climate change are heightened in urban areas and impose a high financial burden to the municipalities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Warmer, wetter, wilder: 38 million people in the Great Lakes region are threatened by climate change

Shoreline communities are already faltering under the weight of billions of dollars in damages — and worrying that climate change will continue to make things even worse.
Six-year-old Makai'ryn Terrio, centre, cools off with his brothers as they play in water fountains in Montréal. The city had its hottest August on record. The Canadian Press/Graham Hughes

What climate change means for southern Ontario and Québec

Southern Québec is warming twice as rapidly as the rest of the world due to the progressive loss of snow cover. An average annual warming of 3 C to 6 C is expected by the end of the century.
Climate change made the devastating flooding in Belgium, Germany and other European countries in July 2021 more likely. Anthony Dehez/Belga/AFP via Getty Images

Is climate change to blame for extreme weather events? Attribution science says yes, for some – here’s how it works

A new attribution study finds human-caused climate change made Europe’s July floods more likely. What about Tennessee’s flooding? An atmospheric scientist explains how scientists make the connection.
Hurricane Harvey dumped an unheard-of 60 inches of rain in parts of Texas in 2017. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Global evidence links rise in extreme precipitation to human-driven climate change

Scientists used artificial neural networks to analyze precipitation records. They found evidence of human activities influencing extreme rainfall or snowfall around the world.
Floods in South East Queensland follow a 40-year cycle, and planners should take note. AAP Image

Floods don’t occur randomly, so why do we still plan as if they do?

Engineering practice assumes that floods are randomly distributed but science suggests they are not. This raises questions about the reliability of flood infrastructure and management strategies.
Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development

Not just heat: even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change

We already know that climate change makes heatwaves hotter and longer. But a new series of research papers asks whether there is also a climate fingerprint on frosty spells and bouts of wet weather.

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