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Articles on Farmworkers

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Planting paddy saplings in Patiala, India. Three-quarters of Indian farmers are women, but most don’t own their land. Bharat Bhushan/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Women grow as much as 80% of India’s food – but its new farm laws overlook their struggles

Most Indian farmers are women. But few own their land, and gender inequality limits their access to markets. These issues won't be fixed by recent agricultural reforms; in fact, they may get worse.
A woman takes part in a protest in Montreal, Jan. 30, 2021, to demand status for all workers and to demand dignity for all non status migrants as full human beings as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don't Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript
A seasonal migrant worker is seen in the Niagara area earlier this spring. (Jane Andres, Niagara Workers Welcome)

Coronavirus: Canada stigmatizes, jeopardizes essential migrant workers

Migrant workers are not inherently more vulnerable to COVID-19, nor more likely to be carrying it than Canadians. Yet our treatment of them this year stigmatizes them and puts them at risk.
Salvadoran immigrants were pivotal in the Justice for Janitors campaign in Los Angeles in 1990. It earned wage increases for custodial staff nationwide and inspired today’s $15 minimum wage campaign. AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

How Central American migrants helped revive the US labor movement

Central Americans who came to the US in the 1980s fleeing civil war drew on their background fighting for social justice back home to help unionize farmworkers, janitors and poultry packers in the US.
Migrants from Honduras, part of the Central American caravan, trying to reach the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, in December 2018. Reuters/Mohammed Salem

Is there a crisis at the US-Mexico border? 6 essential reads

Immigration experts explain who's really trying to cross the US-Mexico border, what they want — and why immigration, even undocumented immigration, actually benefits the country.
In this file photo from 2010, members of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers take part in a march through the streets of Tampa, Fla., to try to persuade the supermarket chain Publix to take a stand against abusive work conditions in the fields. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Migrant farm workers vulnerable to sexual violence

Female migrant farm workers across North America are vulnerable to sexual abuse and assault because the systems set up to temporarily employ them offer no protections or access to citizenship.

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