Articles on financial literacy

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Giving young people financial skills can lead to much better education and job outcomes. Shutterstock

How giving young people basic financial skills helps them find jobs

Arming young people with financial capabilities does improve their employment prospects, but how exactly is still not clear. One possibility is that financial literacy boosts their confidence
Canadians, like many other people around the world, are stressing about money and have amassed a lot of credit-card debt. (Shutterstock)

Escaping the vicious circle of going paycheque to paycheque

People are stressed out about money, with most of us struggling to make ends meet due to abusing credits cards and amassing consumer debt. Some tips on how to change your spending behaviour.
Research suggests we should consider our own care needs, as well as our families’ care needs, when we plan our financial futures. (Shutterstock)

No vacation? Find serenity with these five financial wellness tips

A family economic health expert says there are good reasons why people avoid looking at their finances, so start small to increase confidence.
Indigenous youth planning on attending post-secondary education would benefit from appropriate financial literacy information. Here students Cheyenne Wilson, 13, Roy Joseph, 13, centre, and Connor Roberts, 13, after attending a presentation by B.C.‘s representative for Children and Youth at Shoreline Community School in Victoria, B.C., on May 15, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Financial empowerment is the road to success for Indigenous youth

Indigenous entrepreneurship is growing at a rate six times faster than the general Canadian population and it is 10 years younger. Culturally relevant financial literacy is critical to its success.
Better-educated people are better equipped to ask the right questions and make more informed decisions.

The royal commission should result not only in new regulation, but new education

Let's recognise the limitations of regulation as we try to improve outcomes. Money spent on new regulations may be better put to further educating future customers.
The collapse of a royal commission witness provided a reminder of the stark differences between financial services and health services when it comes to caring for customers. Stefan Postles/AAP

What if we expected financial services to be more like health services?

The financial services industry is in need of a new paradigm to rediscover what finance is for – to improve the financial and economic well-being of society.
The enormous Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey tells the stories of the same group of Australians over the course of their lives. Mavis Wong/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: what the huge HILDA survey reveals about your economic well-being, health and family life

What the huge HILDA survey reveals about your economic well-being, health and family life. The Conversation, CC BY53.6 MB (download)
On today's episode, we'll hear what the huge HILDA survey says on Australians' financial literacy, energy use, how many of us are delaying getting a driver's license and how our economy is changing.
Financial decisions can be a real maze. Andrii Vodolazhskyi/Shutterstock.com

Why we hate making financial decisions – and what to do about it

Research suggests that the reason people may put off funding their 401(k) plans or managing credit card debt is because our perception of finance as 'cold' conflicts with our hot-blooded emotions.
Financial illiteracy contributed to the last financial crisis. Shutterstock

Financial literacy is a public policy problem

It's not just individuals who pay for low financial literacy. It also increases financial risks and holds back the economy.

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