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Articles on Fitbit

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Since the mid-1990s, people have been doing less and less walking or bicycling to work and school and spending a lot more time staring at screens. RainStar/E+ via Getty Images

A boom in fitness trackers isn’t leading to a boom in physical activity – men, women, kids and adults in developed countries are all moving less

Research is revealing that fitness trackers alone can be helpful facilitators toward changing a sedentary lifestyle but don’t motivate people to increase their physical activity.
Mobile health apps and gadgets could help doctors and patients treat chronic illnesses in real time. Moment via Getty

Health apps track vital health stats for millions of people, but doctors aren’t using the data – here’s how it could reduce costs and patient outcomes

Connecting health apps to health care can enable better care for patients with chronic diseases, and it has the potential to lower skyrocketing US health spending.
Industry representatives wear fitness trackers at the International Consumer Electronics Show in January 2014 in Las Vegas. Health and fitness information is being increasingly shared with insurance companies. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Why life insurance companies want your Fitbit data

Insurer John Hancock now requires customers to use activity trackers for life insurance policies. Here’s how that will put life insurance and even mortgages out of reach for many people.
Sales of Apple smartwatches are increasing, while Fitbit sales are on the decline. By Crew [CC0 or CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

The social factors that influence whether you’ll use your wearable device

Research shows that people’s social networks, employment conditions and life stages all impact their use of wearable devices. Understanding these factors can help you achieve your fitness goals.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
We now have the technology to do track our sleep through the night, but that may be doing more harm than good. Marisa/Flickr

Health Check: is your sleep app keeping you up at night?

Tracking sleep is now routine in monitoring overall well-being. But are the devices used to do this actually useful, or have we simply found a more sophisticated way to clock watch?

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