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Articles on Flu vaccine

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Juan Miranda receives a flu shot from Yadira Santiago Banuelos, family nurse practitioner, at the Family Health Clinic of Monon in Monon, Indiana. Purdue University/Rebecca McElhoe

Latinos are especially reluctant to get flu shots – how a small clinic in Indiana found ways to overcome that

Millions of Latinos may not get the influenza shot this year, which could be an indicator of whether they will get a COVID-19 shot. A rural clinic shows how building trust can help overcome reluctance.
Billions of people are going to need a coronavirus vaccine and that demand is going to be hard to meet. Francesco Carta fotografo/Moment via Getty Images

Approval of a coronavirus vaccine would be just the beginning – huge production challenges could cause long delays

Once a coronavirus vaccine is approved, billions of doses need to be manufactured. Current vaccine production is nowhere near ready, for a variety of reasons, but planning now could help.
The arrival of flu season will put more pressure on hospitals already facing the coronavirus pandemic. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images

What happens when COVID-19 and influenza collide? Can hospitals handle the strain?

Pandemic policy experts offer 10 recommendations that could reduce the risk that a bad flu season on top of the COVID-19 pandemic will overwhelm hospitals.
Hospital workers tend to a COVID-19 patient April 7, 2020 in New York City, where hospitals were so crowded they had to transfer patients to different facilities. John Moore/Getty Images

Getting a flu shot this year is more important than ever because of COVID-19

The flu vaccine is now available in most places. A public health nurse explains why it's especially important to get vaccinated for it this year.
The impact of the flu on a population can be measured by looking at figures including cases, hospitalisations and deaths. From shutterstock.com

It’s a bad year for flu, but it’s too early to call it the worst ever – 5 charts on the 2019 season so far

Headlines about this year's flu season have been alarming. It's true, we are having a serious season – but the data doesn't indicate it's the worst one we've ever had.
You might feel terrible. But your runny nose, sore throat and aches are signs your body is fighting the flu virus. And that’s a good thing. from www.shutterstock.com

Sick with the flu? Here’s why you feel so bad

How can a tiny flu virus make you feel so bad, all over? Here's what's behind your high temperature, muscle aches and other flu symptoms.
They’re not perfect, but flu shots are still good to get. AP Photo/David Goldman

This year the flu came in two waves – here’s why

The 2018-2019 flu season was less deadly than the last. But the pattern of infection was unusual, thanks to the various strains circulating and the way flu shots work over time.

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