Articles on France

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A Syrian soldier films the damage of the Syrian Scientific Research Center which was attacked by U.S., British and French military strikes. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

Syria, chemical weapons and the limits of international law

The United Nations Charter doesn't allow the use of military force to prevent chemical weapons attacks — no matter how evil — without UN Security Council approval. That needs to change.
Air strikes by the US, France and Britain destroy the Scientific Research Center building in Damascus, Syria. AAP/ Youssef Badawi

Further strikes on Syria unlikely – but Trump is always the wild card

The US, France and Britain launching air strikes this weekend on Syria in retalition for an alleged gas attack by the Assad regime – but niether side is likely to up the ante soon.
A still from the documentary film ‘Like a Wolf’ about a young kid from an unprivileged background trying to make it in higher education. Comme un Loup

Social determinism starts at school

To what degree do pupils belong to or in a school?
Teaching in Paris in the 14th century (Grandes Chroniques de France).

Teaching is not a science, it is a culture of educative action

Affirming that teaching is a science is tantamount to legitimating the forms of violence that are based on the affirmation of “truths”. Instead, it is a coupling of the activities of a subject-learner and a subject-intervener.
‘I am a migrant’ solidarity signs were displayed during the European Parliament debate on immigration and asylum in the Strasbourg plenary. European Parliament/flickr

Crimes of solidarity: liberté, égalité and France’s crisis of fraternité

Fraternity is one of the three pillars of the French Republic, but social solidarity is fraying as citizens are criminalised for acting on their beliefs in the human rights of asylum seekers.
Charles Platiau

Debate: On secularism in the 21st century

While France and the US both guarantee individual religious freedom, the two nations’ approach to religion in the public sphere and the separation between church and state are profoundly different.
Starting out as a set of demonstrations against university reform, the French uprisings of May 1968 quickly gathered momentum. AAP/EPA/Prefecture de Police Museum

Be realistic – demand the impossible: the legacy of 1968

The protesters who took to the streets of Paris didn't know what they wanted: they just knew what they were against. But they did make us think that maybe there is another, better world.
Detail of ‘Smell’ c1500, from The lady and the unicorn series. wool and silk, 368 x 322 cm Musée de Cluny – Musée national du Moyen Âge, Paris Photo © RMN-GP / M Urtado

Explainer: the symbolism of The Lady and the Unicorn tapestry cycle

The Lady and the Unicorn tapestries, woven around 1500, have been called the 'Mona Lisa of the Middle Ages'. While they make for breathtaking viewing, their threads are encoded with much meaning.
Macron in Davos on Jan. 24, 2018, where he argued that economic growth wasn’t an end in itself. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Macron calls for a ‘global contract’ at Davos

French companies will no longer be 'forbidden to fail' and 'forbidden to succeed,' the French president tells the World Economic Forum.
Johnny Hallyday in concert in May 2014. Mathieu Thouvenin/Flickr

Made in France: how Johnny Hallyday won a nation’s heart

Johnny Hallyday was more than a music icon, he was a cultural symbol for the French lower and the middle classes. In his death he reconciled the country with the term popular culture.

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