Articles on Heart attack

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Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Exercise is medicine, and doctors are starting to prescribe it

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
The flu shot decrease the risk of heart attacks in healthy individuals, according to research. Here, pipettes containing immune cells for testing against possible flu vaccines are seen at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Get the flu shot – to lower your risk of a heart attack

Your risk of a heart attack increases 600 per cent within a week of catching the flu. The flu shot decreases that risk, whether you catch the flu or not.
Heart attacks increase with lower air temperature, lower atmospheric air pressure, higher wind velocity, shorter sunshine duration and colder weather. from shutterstock.com

Heart attacks more frequent in colder weather

Doctors have long acknowledged heart attacks are more likely to occur in cold weather. But now a major study has confirmed it.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn't delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn't experienced either condition before.
Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.
Women are referred less than men for in-hospital treatments such as angioplasty, performed here at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York in 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Why heart disease is often missed in women: The myth of the ‘widowmaker’

Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women globally. And yet women's symptoms and risk factors are less well recognized, and they receive less in-hospital care, than men.
Do not be derailed by news reports that exercise is bad for the heart. Taking more exercise is a New Year’s resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death. (Shutterstock)

Exercise more in 2018 – it really is good for your heart

Taking more exercise is a New Year's resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death.
Many suffer from heart disease despite the fact they don’t smoke, have healthy diets, and are of a healthy weight. Tim Marshall/Unsplash

How our immune system causes heart disease

Many people die of heart disease who don't fit into the traditional risk factors. We're learning the immune system can be to blame.
The benefits of healthy older people taking statins to prevent heart disease and stroke needs to be balanced with the risk of side effects. from www.shutterstock.com

How old is too old for cholesterol lowering medications?

An Australian trial will give us a clearer picture of whether healthy old people benefit from taking statins to prevent heart disease and stroke.

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