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Articles on Honduras

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A woman wades through mud to collect items from her home in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. The devastation brought by hurricanes Eta and Iota in Honduras in November 2020 contributed to a sharp rise in northward migration. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Environmental disasters are fuelling migration — here’s why international law must recognize climate refugees

International refugee law must be overhauled to consider climate change and include “deadly environments” as a form of persecution.
An Argentine justice crusader who calls himself Menganno has been patrolling the streets of the city of Lanus since 2010. Netflix has now picked up his character. Netflix Latinoamérica (screenshot)

How Latin America’s protest superheroes fight injustice and climate change – and sometimes crime, too

In Latin America, common citizens have often donned outlandish outfits and comic book-inspired personas to lead demonstrations and promote social change.
Activists and supporters of Honduran environmental and Indigenous rights activist Berta Caceres hold signs with her name and likeness during the trial against Roberto David Castillo, an alleged mastermind of her murder, outside of the Supreme Court building in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on April 6, 2021. (AP Photo/ Elmer Martinez)

Environmental activists are being killed in Honduras over their opposition to mining

Honduras is the most dangerous country in the world for environmental activists. Those who have opposed mining, hydroelectric, logging and tourism have faced violence and death.
Children play in Las Flores village, Comitancillo, Guatemala, home of a 22-year-old migrant murdered in January 2021 on his journey through Mexico. Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images

Money alone can’t fix Central America – or stop migration to US

Biden’s $4 billion plan to fight crime, corruption and poverty in Central America is massive. But aid can’t build viable democracies if ‘predatory elites’ won’t help their own people.
U.S. Border Patrol detains tens of thousands of the families and children who try to cross U.S. borders every year. AP Photo/Julio Cortez

The situation at the US-Mexico border is a crisis – but is it new?

Children and families have been fleeing to the US in rising numbers for nearly a decade. So why is the current situation at the US-Mexico border being viewed as something new?
Lawmakers hide in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol as Trump supporters raid the building on Jan. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

By inciting Capitol mob, Trump pushes U.S. closer to a banana republic

Rather than denigrating other nations as banana republics for their penchant for insurrections and lawless coups, the United States needs to take a long look inward following the raid on the Capitol.
In this April 2019 photo, migrants planning to join a caravan of several hundred people hoping to reach the United States wait at the bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

The role of Canadian mining in the plight of Central American migrants

Canada is playing a role in the life-and-death struggle for migrant justice in the United States – from our foreign economic policies to the actions of our mining companies and domestic asylum laws.
A member of Mexico’s National Guard watches for migrants on the Rio Suchiate between Guatemala and Mexico at sunrise on July 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Idalia Rie)

As Mexico appeases Trump, migrants bear the brunt

The U.S. will likely continue to threaten Mexico with trade tariffs due to Central American migrants, and Mexico will respond with more drastic, inhumane measures. None of it will stop migration.
A man hugs his family before leaving for the U.S. border with a migrant caravan from San Salvador, El Salvador, Jan. 16, 2019. AP/Salvador Melendez

Migrants’ stories: Why they flee

Thousands of Central American migrants are trying to cross the U.S. southern border. One scholar followed their paths to find out why they make the dangerous, sometimes deadly, journey.
Migrants from Honduras, part of the Central American caravan, trying to reach the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, in December 2018. Reuters/Mohammed Salem

Is there a crisis at the US-Mexico border? 6 essential reads

Immigration experts explain who’s really trying to cross the US-Mexico border, what they want — and why immigration, even undocumented immigration, actually benefits the country.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem ‘dumped’ on America’s doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.
Migrants travel in groups through Mexico for safety reasons. But Mexico is still one of the world’s most dangerous countries. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Dozens of migrants disappear in Mexico as Central American caravan pushes northward

Two trucks carrying migrants have gone missing in Veracruz, Mexico. A witness says that ‘65 children and seven women were sold’ to a band of armed men. Other caravan members have reached the border.
Members of the migrant caravan, mostly Hondurans, cross a river that separates Guatemala and Mexico. EPA/Esteban Biba

Origins and implications of the caravan of Honduran migrants

Honduran migrants trudging north towards the US-Mexico border are fleeing violence and poverty that has its roots in activities of 10th-century American fruit companies.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
A global survey claims South Africans don’t trust their police. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

The Law and Order Index says South Africans feel less secure than people in Yemen, the DRC and Libya, countries all affected by violent conflict.

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