Articles on Honduras

Displaying 1 - 20 of 25 articles

In this April 2019 photo, migrants planning to join a caravan of several hundred people hoping to reach the United States wait at the bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

The role of Canadian mining in the plight of Central American migrants

Canada is playing a role in the life-and-death struggle for migrant justice in the United States -- from our foreign economic policies to the actions of our mining companies and domestic asylum laws.
A member of Mexico’s National Guard watches for migrants on the Rio Suchiate between Guatemala and Mexico at sunrise on July 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Idalia Rie)

As Mexico appeases Trump, migrants bear the brunt

The U.S. will likely continue to threaten Mexico with trade tariffs due to Central American migrants, and Mexico will respond with more drastic, inhumane measures. None of it will stop migration.
A man hugs his family before leaving for the U.S. border with a migrant caravan from San Salvador, El Salvador, Jan. 16, 2019. AP/Salvador Melendez

Migrants’ stories: Why they flee

Thousands of Central American migrants are trying to cross the U.S. southern border. One scholar followed their paths to find out why they make the dangerous, sometimes deadly, journey.
Migrants from Honduras, part of the Central American caravan, trying to reach the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, in December 2018. Reuters/Mohammed Salem

Is there a crisis at the US-Mexico border? 6 essential reads

Immigration experts explain who's really trying to cross the US-Mexico border, what they want — and why immigration, even undocumented immigration, actually benefits the country.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem 'dumped' on America's doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.
Members of the migrant caravan, mostly Hondurans, cross a river that separates Guatemala and Mexico. EPA/Esteban Biba

Origins and implications of the caravan of Honduran migrants

Honduran migrants trudging north towards the US-Mexico border are fleeing violence and poverty that has its roots in activities of 10th-century American fruit companies.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
A global survey claims South Africans don’t trust their police. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

The Law and Order Index says South Africans feel less secure than people in Yemen, the DRC and Libya, countries all affected by violent conflict.
Immigrant children separated from their parents who were detained at the U.S.-Mexico border arrive at a foster care facility in East Harlem on June 22. Rainmaker Photo/MediaPunch /IPX

For many immigrant families, the fight for reunification is just beginning

History shows that the US court system isn't sympathetic to undocumented migrants when it comes to parental rights.
Violence erupted across Honduras as the country responded to a presidential election that’s too close to call. No matter who wins, the bloodshed is likely to continue. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Honduras’s election crisis is likely to end in violence

Nearly two weeks after its election, Honduras still does not have a president. Clashes across the country have killed a dozen protesters, and police are now refusing to enforce a national curfew.
Arrests aside, until the politicians who collude with gangs are stopped, crime in Central America will likely continue unchecked. Reuters/Jose Cabezas

In Central America, gangs like MS-13 are bad – but corrupt politicians may be worse

Corruption, not gang warfare, is the root cause of the record violence in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. Until public officials stop shielding criminal groups like MS-13, lawlessness will reign.

Top contributors

More